employee value proposition

It’s time to go back to your roots. Every company needs to identify their business value proposition. An employee value proposition is exactly the same. Identify your employee value proposition, and consider it your north star. 

As you grow as a carrier, it’s easy for your core hiring offerings to get lost. Avoid the trap. A strong employee value proposition is about more than improved marketing. It should drive everything from your recruiting to your business model. Can you answer in 1-3 sentences:

1. Why is my company different (and better) than the competition?
2. What about my company is attractive to truck drivers?

This is your Employee Value Proposition. 

hours of service proposed ruleWhy is an Employee Value Proposition Critical?

The way we recruit employees has changed. Over the past decade, candidates have been steadily becoming more and more powerful in the job search. As a result, attracting the best talent has become harder than ever. As an employer, consistent and efficient communication of your employee value proposition has become extremely important.

Tips to Make Your Employee Value Proposition Stand Out

Now that you have identified your employee value proposition, make sure you package it in a way that is attractive to candidates. Here are a few tips to help you stand out from the crowd.

1. Move Beyond the Pay Rate

Your future drivers need more than a paycheck to be happy. It’s true, pay is often one of the first things cited by drivers as either a huge benefit of or drawback of a company, but you need to go deeper.

Start by thinking about what you have to offer as other forms of compensation: benefits, bonuses programs, loyalty incentives, other perks. Then, go beyond the finances.

Do you excel at creating a positive work culture or work environment with fair treatment or great home/family time? How about a focus on career? Career development opportunities and strong training or orientation programs can be very attractive to drivers. Make sure you can clearly identify what makes your company a great place to work. Then, talk about it! 

2. Make it Compelling

truck driver job description templateAn Employee Value Proposition should provide the foundation for your recruiting and retention strategy. It must be unique, compelling, and relevant if it is to act as a key driver of talent attraction, engagement, and retention. Be clear in what you offer, and make sure to cover all the core reasons that people are proud and motivated to work at your company. 

If you have a great company culture, try to capture your distinct company experience. Are your drivers offered good home time? Build on the emotional aspects of why your company considers that important. Those reasons will resonate with your drivers and tell them you care about their well being as an individual, both on and off the job. Make sure to incorporate your value proposition into your job descriptions.

Free Template: Truck Driver Job Description

Follow this template to make sure your job descriptions are converting.

 

3. Talk About it In the Interview

Crucial Conversations with Driver Candidates: 3 Ways to Prepare

When interviewing a truck driver, focus on why your company is better than the competition. You are considering these drivers as potential employees. But, they also need to be sold on your company. Why is your company so special? How are you different? Why do drivers want to join your company and stay with you? Don’t let a good candidate leave the interview without sharing your employee value proposition. They need to view your company as a strong personal and professional fit.

4. Focus on What Matters

An effective employee value proposition rests on the foundation of driver personas. When you know what kind of drivers you want, you can align your value proposition with their interests.

To Determine Your Driver Personas: 

  1. Define the most important characteristics of your ideal driver. Do you need someone who is:
    • Reliable/timely?
    • Confidence/perseverance?
    • Courteous/willing to help others?
    • A good mechanic?
    • Prioritizing healthy habits?
  2. Set your goals
    • How many drivers do you need?
    • What’s your typical recruiting conversion rate?
    • Based on that, how many leads do you need?
    • Do you currently have empty trucks?
    • How are you planning for future growth?  

Use your ideal driver persona and your company goals to steer your employee value proposition. When they are well aligned, you are more likely to attract the drivers you want to hire. 

5. Consider Your Candidates Against Your Employee Value Proposition

With a little training and practice, probably most people can manage to drive a tractor-trailer. However, professional truck driving is more than just getting a vehicle from Point A to Point B. 

Great truck drivers are much more than mere steering-wheel holders. Driving a heavy vehicle with its cargo of costly supplies and equipment and keeping to a demanding schedule isn’t a job for an ordinary driver.

Use your ideal driver persona to evaluate applicants. Then, consider whether those applicants are attracted by your Employee Value Proposition. If so, you’ve likely found a good fit. If not, you may want to consider what types of benefits would be most attractive to the types of drivers you want to recruit. Doing so will make it easier to recruit those drivers AND retain them for longer.

The Quick Guide to Employee Value Proposition

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Employee Value Proposition

This free guide helps you create your employee value proposition and also effectively communicate it to drivers.

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Trucking recruiter Skills to master

Deciding what grade of gas to add to your fuel tank? Easy. Finding quality tanker haulers to transport that gasoline? Much harder. As a trucking recruiter, you’re all too familiar with the challenges of hiring owner operators and company drivers: driver shortages, high turnover rates, and an ever changing recruitment landscape are just some of your daily obstacles. Since you are the first face of your company to interact with drivers, it’s critical to be prepared with the skills that will turn your list of leads into great hires. Here are the top 5 skills that every trucking recruiter should master. 

1. Be strategically proactive

It’s a driver’s market. If you want to be a trucking recruiter who successfully reaches quality drivers, it’s on you to be proactive. That said, being proactive should be a strategic plan and not just aggressive outreach. Consider the times and channels that are most likely to be productive for the drivers you seek. Recruiting local or regional routes? Try calling in the evening to avoid busy loading and unloading schedules. Seeking OTR drivers? Make sure there’s a mobile-friendly website for drivers who are looking for jobs while on a driving break. Once you’ve optimized your strategy, continually reach out through multiple channels to engage new leads and reconnect with old leads.

2. Know your audience

This might seem obvious, especially to an experienced trucking recruiter, but it couldn’t be more important. The Commercial Carrier Journal found that the overwhelming majority of surveyed drivers cited inadequate pay as a reason fleets are struggling to find drivers. That’s likely not a surprise. Perhaps more striking is that lack of respect and lack of home time are responses two and three for the same question.

If you want to increase the number of quality drivers you hire, you need to know their priorities and address their concerns.

Identify the benefits that are most important to your candidates, and offer those perks whenever possible. Be straightforward about what drivers can expect on the job. Many will find your honesty refreshing and a compelling reason to join your company.

3. Take advantage of technology

Gone are the days where a clean, mobile-friendly user interface was a nice, extra touch used by only the most tech savvy trucking recruiters. According to the 2019 Overdrive Connectivity report produced by Randall-Reilly, 74% of owner operators use a smartphone to access the internet. Over half of those same drivers use a phone more than any other device to access the internet. As for company drivers, 77% use smartphones to access the internet. 65% of company drivers use their smartphone to access the internet more than any other device. With this in mind, don’t just make your recruiting mobile-friendly. Optimize your process with the assumption that most drivers will be recruited first, and possibly exclusively, on a smartphone.

4. Prioritize your workload

Coming into a new year or quarter, it is tempting to take on a heavy load, but don’t get caught in the frenzy.

Your hours are limited. Take the time to prioritize your leads based on urgency and fit early on to increase your overall productivity.

Evaluate which candidates are most likely to fit your positions. Are they qualified? Which drivers are really a good match for you? Is your company really a good match for them? Speak with each driver and understand their priorities. Then, be candid if they’re not a good fit. Remember, hiring a bad match increases turnover and leaves a bad impression on drivers. Since time is critical, engage your strongest leads first. You’ll be glad you took time to slow down at the beginning so that you can efficiently recruit the drivers best suited for your fleet.

5. Build relationships, not just a sales funnel

Even when time is of the essence, you can’t afford not to get to know your potential drivers.

As a trucking recruiter, you may feel like there isn’t time to build relationships, but it’s time well spent. 

Taking the time to build relationships and treat drivers like people, not leads might reveal key information that will improve position fit. Unsurprisingly, better fit ultimately leads to improved driver retention. Most recruiters know that drivers need to be qualified for particular jobs, but it goes beyond just having the right certifications. As you know, experienced drivers have the opportunity to choose jobs that meet their lifestyle and goals. Identify what those are and find ways to meet them. Drivers who are satisfied with their time at home, model of truck, and who feel they can meet their goals with your company will perform better and stay longer. If you want to improve your sales funnel, taking the time to build relationships with potential drivers is time you can’t afford to not spend.

 

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female truck drivers

Whether you like it or not, trucking is changing. The industry is short about 60,000 drivers, which could double in 10 years as the current generation of truckers retire. The ongoing driver shortage is forcing fleets to think outside the box and attract non-traditional candidates into the driver pool. Historically, truck drivers have been mostly men, but more women have been joining in the industry over the last decade. Attracting “new blood” into a career into trucking won’t be the same as age-old hiring and retention methods, as female truck drivers have different priorities and needs. Here are four ways to appeal to female truck drivers and embed them into your fleet.

Importance of appealing to female drivers

Despite comprising 47% of the population, women hold only about 6% of truck driving jobs. This means there is a massive pool of untapped potential in the workforce which could address the driver shortage.

The data suggest that women alone could fix the driver shortage if those numbers increased

This issue has been so prevalent in transportation and logistics circles, that it was even featured on NPR earlier this year. Having a fleet with female drivers has plenty of benefits. According to Ellen Voie, President and CEO of Women in Trucking, women tend to stay with fleets longer, engage in less risky driving, and value team collaboration and goal achievement.

So how could carriers appeal to female truck drivers? First, carriers need to recognize that women drivers will have concerns which are slightly different from male drivers. Since trucking has been a male-dominated profession for so long, many of the policies, rules, and norms have developed accordingly. Making trucking a more appealing profession for women means questioning why things have always been a certain way and demonstrating a willingness to change them when needed. One of the biggest differences between male and female drivers is their reason for turnover. While men cite home time as the top reason, women cite a few others. Women were most concerned about the quality of equipment, the issue of safety, and poor relationships with coworkers. Let’s see how carriers can address these one at a time.

Equipment

The concern over equipment is two-fold. First, consider the ergonomics of the cab. Truck cabs are generally built to fit the physical size of a larger man. It can be difficult for some women to reach the controls or get the seats adjusted into a comfortable position while keeping their feet on the pedals. The same could actually be said for a male of smaller stature.

How well the truck cab will fit an average female physique will impact whether women drivers will feel comfortable on the job

Second, there’s the issue of truck maintenance. Women drivers say they want a piece of equipment that they can count on, so that they don’t break down on the side of the road. Carriers can take many steps to address these problems. Apart from investing in newer and better equipment, carriers can also purchase cabin accessories, or make mechanical adjustments in the cabin to better accommodate female drivers. Carriers can also either provide simple mechanical training to female drivers or offer that company mechanics will always walk them through any troubleshooting in the form of real-time roadside assistance.

Safety

Another reason which female truck drivers cite for leaving a carrier is that of safety, whether that be on the road or in the truck itself. Research shows that women tend to be safer truck drivers who abide by the speed limits and get into fewer accidents. Meanwhile, technology is making trucks safer and easier to drive, which is good news for any new driver. Some new trucks don’t require shifting, and on-board systems watch the lanes and even apply the brakes automatically. While veteran drivers might be resistant to such technology, women embrace it.

The result is a safer and more comfortable driver behind the wheel.

A second issue of safety is one that women of all ages and backgrounds are aware of. Safety from physical harm or the threat of sexual violence is important for all women but affects female truck drivers in unique ways. A truck driver’s lifestyle is in constant flux since they are always on the road. Female truck drivers may find themselves in unsafe or uncomfortable situations at truck stops, or shipper/receiver locations. People may react skeptically or negatively to solo female drivers and voice this in an aggressive manner. Women in Trucking has been working with several truck stops to make them more friendly to women drivers. Carriers can also aid in this effort, by pointing out which truck stops are safest, and which should be avoided.

Pro-woman culture

Women also tend to leave trucking for reasons of work relationships. Specifically, female drivers stay longer if they have a good relationship with their dispatcher, but will leave quicker if that becomes difficult. Dispatchers and fleet managers are the people that drivers interact with most so it follows that women would cite them. It’s not hard to imagine that female drivers may not be fully accepted into the trucking culture and lifestyle. Similar difficulties in relationships may arise with others such as shippers, receivers, fellow drivers, and even recruiters. The problem is a workplace culture that hasn’t been pro-woman enough in the past and is suddenly facing new changes.

The good news is that carriers can lead the way in changing the culture, improving workplace relationships, and making women feel more accepted

Pairing female recruits with other women drivers during training creates a comfort level that is helpful to integrate them into the job. Similarly, carriers can create a women’s driver social group for female drivers to share advice and advocate for their concerns. Companies can also design pro-woman driver awareness campaigns to emphasize the importance of women to dispatchers, male-drivers, and other co-workers. Small steps like these are not just a good marketing move for carriers, but also signal to the industry and other women that you’re serious about hiring more female truck drivers, changing the culture, and making women feel welcome in trucking.

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There’s a multitude of choices out there for CDL drivers when it comes to searching for a new truck driving job. Jobs are being advertised every day in truck stops and magazines. Add to that the barrage of emails, text messages, and phone calls drivers get daily, the messaging can become overwhelming. And definitely confusing.

An employer’s goal should be to get their job posting in front of drivers in a marketplace once the driver is ready to receive it, and where the driver is comfortable giving out their personal information to connect. Truck drivers should trust that the job board will help find the best matches for the specific type of job they want. But that doesn’t always happen. Here are 4 pitfalls to know before using another truck driver job board website.

1. Quantity Over Quality

Many job boards pride themselves on the premise of “quantity over quality”. It’s all about the volume of leads. Carriers want to find pools of available drivers to fill their open jobs. But does more always mean better?

Some job boards claim to have thousands, hundreds of thousands, or even a million+ drivers. But if all of those “leads” don’t have anything to do with the types of jobs you’re seeking to fill, what difference does it make?

You’re going to still need to do a lot of work to sift through that pile of names to try and find someone who fits your needs. Focusing on quality over quantity has many benefits. Although the approach requires having a more methodical recruitment system, it can end up saving you time, money, and energy in the long-run.

2. Driver Privacy / Information Security

Hiring managers want more than just a name and phone number to start a conversation with a prospective driver. A completed DOT application is probably your ideal place to start. However, for drivers to feel comfortable providing more than some basic personal data, those drivers need to trust that their information is safe and secure and not going to be sent out or sold without their knowledge.

Job boards are notorious for sharing collected information with third-parties.

You should make sure you’re listing your jobs with reputable services so that drivers are willing to share more information with you prior to connecting with them. This helps ensure your search for a candidate starts off on the right foot.

3. Driver-Focused

Truck driver job boards often don’t have the drivers’ needs first. If the focus isn’t about what’s in it for the driver, the job postings on those boards might not get much traction if they don’t grab the driver’s attention and keep it.

Driver-centric recruiting techniques result in the most fruitful leads. When searching for job boards, be sure that they fit the drivers needs with the way they work and the way that they interact with them. Being mobile friendly, easy to use, and most importantly, speaking to drivers in a way they want to be spoken to, are things that make drivers feel like a particular truck driver job board is a good for them.

4. Qualified Matches

Truck drivers only decide to go looking for a new job when they no longer feel that their current job is meeting their needs. Those needs might be financial, driving preferences, work / life balance considerations, time away from home, or benefits related.

No matter what the reason, any good truck driver job board should know what the driver is looking for, as well as what the carrier needs are in order to produce a good match. A match that is qualified on each side’s preferences.

If you take a little bit more time up-front to be clear on what you’re looking for and what type of company the job is for, you can find yourself further down the hiring path faster, with the perfect candidate for your next hire.

If you’ve already spent too much time searching for truck driver job boards that you hope will find you great candidates to hire, we invite you to try something different and register with Drive My Way. We pride ourselves in standing out in the market, focusing on matching you with the right driver for your job instead of providing you with a giant list of “leads” that waste your time. If you’re ready to try something different and recruit for retention, schedule a demo of our platform today.

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Find and Retain Qualified CDL Drivers

Drive My Way matches drivers with companies based on professional qualifications and lifestyle choices.

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best-trucking-companies

Truck drivers are constantly bombarded with information by companies about why they are great to work for. They also hear about companies through their reputation with other drivers. Both seasoned drivers and rookies are interested in hearing about the best truck driving companies to work for. The top companies have some of the best salaries and compensation, benefits, and other perks. But more importantly, they also prioritize home time, have a strong company culture, and are known for respecting their drivers.

Ultimately, the best companies are the ones that suit the individual needs of drivers, including that of region, type of runs and hauls. Nevertheless, there are some companies that consistently rank high, regardless of preferences. Here are 6 of the best truck driving companies to work for in 2019, in no particular order.

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Billboard

High turnover and the enduring truck driver shortage make your fleet’s recruitment efforts of supreme importance. Advertising jobs to drivers is one of the first steps in strong recruitment. If drivers don’t see your ads, there is no chance of them applying to your jobs. Driver recruitment advertising is completely different than it was about 10 years ago. As always, advertising means you should meet drivers where they are and speak their language. If you’re not taking advantage of changing trends and best practices, you’re risking losing the best drivers to rival carriers. Here are 6 things wrong with your truck driver advertising you can improve on.

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thank-you

One of the biggest complaints from truck drivers is not about salary or benefits, but rather that they don’t feel appreciated by their fleets. Drivers want to feel like an integral part of the team, not just another number or a cog in the machine. National Truck Driver Appreciation Week in September is a great time to set aside and show drivers your appreciation, but it doesn’t have to stop there.

Driver appreciation can and should be a year-round activity. After all, appreciation is a key component of driver retention. So whether you’re a recruiter, dispatcher, fleet manager, or executive, take some time to show your drivers how much you and your company value them. Here are seven truck driver appreciation ideas you can use anytime.

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driver-engagement-survey

Employee surveys are becoming a popular and strong way to measure the engagement and satisfaction with the job. Surveys can help get an idea of employee performance and retention. Other surveys will help employers understand their drivers better and get a sense of what is important to them. Read more

truck driver stats

“Know your audience” is one of the key mantras of the business world now, regardless of which industry or market one is in. Truck drivers are the lifeblood of the transportation industry. They literally connect the industry’s different players together through the mobile nature of their workers.

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recruit-truck-drivers

Given the shortage of drivers currently facing the truck industry, there’s a constant need to keep recruiting truck drivers. While hiring, training, and retaining drivers over the long-term is crucially important, and presents its own challenges, it all begins with recruitment of the right candidates.

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