calculate cost per mile

Calculating cost per mile (CPM) is one of the most common ways that carriers evaluate the financial success of their fleets. Calculating and tracking CPM consistently can give a carrier better insight into their overall costs and how to run their fleet more efficiently. Here’s how to calculate CPM and use it to better your fleet.  

What is Cost Per Mile?

semi truck in the desert

CPM is a simple metric that’s used to show how much each mile on the road is costing your carrier. An optimized fleet will attempt to maximize their CPM and reevaluate this number regularly so that they can continuously find ways to lower it.  

Why Calculate Cost Per Mile?

Calculating and tracking CPM allows a carrier to see how efficiently its fleet is performing. CPM can also be used to inform the rate that you charge shippers. Profitable carriers have load rates that are (on average) higher than their CPM. Being confident in CPM allows carriers to better identify and reduce unnecessary costs while optimizing spending. 

How do you Calculate CPM?

truck lot

Fleets can calculate CPM by dividing their operating costs by the miles their trucks drive. To begin calculating this, you’ll need to first itemize your operating costs and evaluate your current truck mileage. 

Operating costs include any cost associated with running your company. The three main operating costs are fixed costs, variable costs, and salaries. Because some of these costs will change frequently, your CPM will fluctuate. This is why reassessing CPM regularly is key. Tracking it monthly or quarterly is a good place to start. 

Fixed Costs 

As the name suggests, fixed costs are the consistent expenses that more or less stay the same month after month. You will incur these costs regardless of whether your trucks are running miles or sitting on a lot. Permits, insurance, and property lease payments are a few examples of common fixed costs. 

Variable Costs 

Variable costs will fluctuate over time, sometimes minimally, sometimes dramatically. Unlike fixed costs, variable costs are closely tied to how much you run your trucks. Diesel fuel, maintenance, food, and lodging are all variable costs. The more you run your trucks, the higher these costs will be, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. 

Driver Pay 

In many ways, driver pay is a variable cost, but it deserves its own separate category because it has such a large impact on CPM. Typically, driver pay is one of the biggest recurring costs. Like other variable costs, the more miles that trucks run, the more the variable cost increases. 

Becoming More Profitable

happy truck driver

Once you’ve calculated your fleet’s CPM, you’ll probably be looking for ways to lower it. You can do that by either reducing your operating costs or increasing your fleet’s profitability.  

Reduce Operating Costs 

Calculating your CPM may have highlighted areas where operational costs could be cut. While cutting costs is usually thought of as a positive, think carefully before you decide whether and where to cut your budget. 

Some decisions, such as decreasing driver salaries, may seem appealing because it can dramatically reduce your CPM. However, the long-term effects are likely to make things worse. A decision like this could lead to higher turnover, increased recruitment costs, and a poor company reputation. 

Increase Gross Income 

The other way to grow your company’s profitability is to increase income. Raising load rates is one way to do this. A higher load rate will mean better returns on your loads.  

Another option is to run more miles. In this case, fixed costs stay the same, and variable costs are proportionally reduced. As a result, the CPM rate drops. 

Understanding your carrier’s CPM will make financial decisions related to your fleet much easier to make. To be a top trucking company, analyze your CPM rate regularly to effectively respond to industry or fleet-based changes. 

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

work anniversaryAs truck driver retention continues to be an issue across the industry, companies should take every opportunity to show their drivers that they’re appreciated for the work they do day in and day out. One of the best ways to show your carrier’s appreciation is to take time to celebrate a driver’s work anniversary.  

A lot of work anniversary ideas on the internet rely on things you can do in an office setting. Since this doesn’t apply to truck drivers, here are 5 things your team can do to celebrate truck driver work anniversaries. 

1. Cash Bonuses

There’s no substitute for cash. Rewarding drivers who’ve stayed on with your carrier with a monetary bonus is a tried-and-true way to show your carrier’s appreciation and increase the likelihood of them staying on to celebrate another work anniversary next year. 

2. Gift Card

Aside from cash, gift cards are another great option. You could go with something universal that would work for almost anyone, like an Amazon or Target gift card, or you could go for something a little more personalized.  

If you happen to know that a driver is a huge fan of the outdoors, get them a Cabella’s or REI gift card instead. This signals to the driver that your carrier knows who they are as a person, and not just a number. 

3. Gifts

Gift cards and cash are great, but to certain drivers, there’s a chance they’ll come across as a little impersonal. Instead, think about a gift that would make your driver’s life easier on the road. A nice pair of UV blocking sunglasses, a high-end insulated tumbler, or a subscription to a streaming service like Spotify or Audible are all great gifts.  

Another option for gift giving is to go with something personalized. A custom piece of company swag with the driver’s name on it can signal a sense of belonging as part of the team.  

4. Time off

It’s hard to overstate the value of an unexpected day off. Rewarding loyal drivers with a surprise extra day of vacation or PTO can be the best way to celebrate, especially if you know the driver has a family/children they can enjoy their time off with.

5. Award

When you’re celebrating a driver who’s been with your carrier for 5, 10, 15 or more years, consider getting them a trophy or plaque to commemorate the milestone. These types of gifts can be used for any driver, but to keep their status, it’s a good idea to only give them out to drivers who have been with your company for a long time.  

There’s no rule that says that you have to do a plaque or basic trophy either. As with other gifts, take the driver’s personality into the equation. For example, if you’re celebrating a driver who’s a big UFC or wrestling fan, consider getting them a custom championship belt instead.

If you plan on going this route, make sure to supplement it with another gift, like cash or a gift card. Awards are nice and all, but drivers will also want something they can get some use out of as well.  

The key to celebrating your drivers’ work anniversaries is to not go at it with a one size fit all approach. Just like you wouldn’t give the same gift to everyone on your Christmas shopping list, you shouldn’t do the same with the drivers in your fleet.

Comprehensive CDL Recruitment Solutions

Ready to start recruiting the right drivers? Our solutions experts are happy to answer any questions and show you how Drive My Way uniquely approaches CDL driver recruitment.

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slip seating

The philosophy in the trucking industry for regional and OTR was always “one driver, one truck.” As with many things in the industry, recent regulatory and economic changes have made that norm less practical for many companies.  

Equipment efficiencies and financial incentives are pushing some companies to implement slip seating. There is, understandably, some driver resistance to this new way of doing things. This is why it’s important to understand the pros and cons so you can evaluate whether it’s right for your company.  

What Is Slip Seating?

Slip seating is when multiple drivers share a truck. Drivers don’t have a single cab that they are solely responsible for or that is reserved for their use. 

In the trucking industry, slip seating has not historically been the norm, especially for regional and OTR drivers. While there are good financial reasons for employers to use it, slip seating often comes at the expense of employee satisfaction.  

Pros

Better Equipment Utilization 

As a recruiter or fleet manager, you have a responsibility for the overall financial health of your company. From that perspective, slip seating often makes good economic sense.  

First and foremost, it allows for greater equipment utilization because you can drastically reduce the amount of time that a truck will sit empty in the yard while its designated driver is not on shift. Slip seating allows a company to make more runs in the same amount of time without buying more equipment.  

Tax Incentives 

In addition to time efficiencies, there are tax incentives to using slip seating as well. You can take advantage of these incentives if you account for the depreciation of trucks as an asset. According to Duff Swain, president of the consulting firm Trincon Group LLC in a FleetOwner article, trucks can be depreciated over a 3 year period.

The best way to maximize profits while minimizing expenses and taxes is to drive at least 700,000 miles per truck in three years. Realistically, 700,000 miles over three years is not feasible for a single driver. So, to reach optimal mileage, slip seating is a must. 

Cons

Driver Dissatisfaction 

Perhaps the biggest downside is that many drivers don’t like it. It might be easy to dismiss driver concerns under the pretense that they will soon adapt to new policies. However, think twice before making your decision. 

Driver complaints are legitimate and could affect not only company morale and reputation, but also, the company’s bottom line. Driver happiness is a huge driver of retention. 

Why are drivers so against it? Drivers who are a part of a company that utilizes slip seating cite messy cabs, the inefficient use of time required to move belongings to and from different cabs, and less well-maintained equipment as their top concerns. In these cases, since no driver views the truck as their own, they may be less likely to treat it with the care and cleanliness they would if a truck was their own.

Maintenance & Health 

In addition to driver concerns, employers should consider that slip seating increases the number of miles driven on each truck. As a result, routine maintenance or repairs may come up more frequently.  

Health concerns should also be a top consideration, especially in light of Covid-19. Multiple drivers using the same enclosed space in rapid succession means that disinfecting and other health safety protocols should be a high priority before each driver change.  

The Bottom Line

There are clear benefits and drawbacks to implementing slip seating in your fleet. Ultimately, it’s a company decision. Also keep in mind that this decision doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Some companies may find it advantageous to use slip seating for some trucks, but not for their entire fleet.  

Just keep in mind that it’s very likely that if you implement slip seating, any increased financial gains will be offset by increased driver dissatisfaction. If you still find it viable to go with slip seating, the next question you should ask is “Where can I make that satisfaction up?” 

Providing monetary bonuses, implementing recognition/incentive programs, and providing career-building opportunities are just a few ways that companies who use slip seating are still able to have high driver satisfaction. Ultimately, most people are willing to put up with working arrangements that aren’t ideal if they like their job and the people they work for. 

Comprehensive CDL Recruitment Solutions

Ready to start recruiting the right drivers? Our solutions experts are happy to answer any questions and show you how Drive My Way uniquely approaches CDL driver recruitment.

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Everyone wants to feel appreciated while at work, and truck drivers are no different. This is why having driver incentive and appreciation programs are so important for carriers looking to recruit and retain top talent.

Here are some of the best types of truck driver incentive programs, the best practices for putting them in place, and an interview with representatives from an industry leader in driver recognition and incentives, Paper Transport.

What Are the Best Types of Incentives?

When putting together driver incentive programs, there are a few things to keep in mind. Think about what is a perceived benefit to your drivers, and what your overall company goals are. Striking a good balance between the two is where the best incentive programs will be created.

Are you falling short with on-time deliveries? Are your fuel efficiency metrics not being met? Is turnover too high? These are great places to start designing incentives to encourage change. Here are the three key types of driver incentive programs.

Additional Compensation

This is usually the go-to for any driver incentive program. Reward your drivers with cash if they achieve a stated goal within a certain time frame. That can be either a raise in their hourly rate, or an additional check that goes on-top of their normal take home pay. Cash rewards are fairly standard, and you can use them at any time, even as part of the hiring process to encourage drivers to stay with the company.

Recognition Rewards

Giving drivers something other than a financial incentive can sometimes be the greater influence on positive behavior. A certificate, their name on a plaque somewhere prominent, or even a mention in a company newsletter to acknowledge their accomplishment could be more impactful than money could ever be. This type of reward is something they’ll have forever, and the memory and sense of appreciation that go along with it might last far longer than the bonus ever would.

Catalog Programs

Some companies choose to have achieving small milestones accumulate points over time. Drivers can then redeem these point for items in a catalog. These types of programs can help change behavior consistently over time since drivers might be working towards a new gadget that they’d love to have. Or even better, something that they know that their spouse would really love as a gift.

Incentive Programs Implementation

Measure consistently

You should be able to easily measure any progress toward driver goals objectively. Be sure that the rules in place for your programs are clear as to how results are tallied, and by when. When the time frame for achieving them has passed, everyone should be able to see where they landed in relation to the goals.

Be fair

Fairness should be built into any employee program. Otherwise drivers will become disinterested in the program and stop applying themselves towards it. Of course, nobody is trying to be unfair with their incentive programs, but problems with fairness could arise that you would never think about.

For example, say your carrier has an incentive program where drivers who go X miles without an accident get some sort of financial reward. While a good idea in theory, it could be seen as unfair if your carrier has drivers doing different types of runs. This goal would be much easier for local drivers who spend most of their time in suburban areas than it is for OTR or regional drivers who mostly drive on congested highways.

The solution for a program like this would be to have a tiered or scaled approach for the incentive depending on the variety of the runs and types of drivers you have. There’s always a way to be different and still keep things fair. This is the best way to avoid disengagement with your programs. It also ensures that each driver feels a sense of belonging to the overall company goals.

An Interview with Amber Long and Cate Whitman

Cate Whitman, Marketing and Communications Manager, Paper Transport

We were able to speak with Amber Long, Recruiting Operations Manager and Cate Whitman, Marketing and Communications Manager with Drive My Way client, Paper Transport. For years, Paper Transport has been an industry leader in terms of driver happiness and incentive programs.

Amber and Cate spoke to us about the different truck driver incentive programs they have, which have been the most successful, and their new “Accelerate” driver finishing program.

What incentives does Paper Transport offer to drivers?

“We offer several incentive bonuses to our drivers including PSP inspection, referral, monthly MPG, and CSA bonuses, as well as “Driver of the Month/Quarter” bonuses that are based on our driver scorecards. Using the scorecards, drivers can see where they rank monthly in metrics like safety, performance, and productivity.

Aside from those traditional “bonus” incentive programs, we also offer our drivers a wellness program with an onsite nurse practitioner. The nurse comes in to do check-ins and follow-ups with drivers about any medical or health concerns they may have. This is a program that was started during covid, and we’re planning to keep around. It’s just one more way that we try to provide support for our drivers.”

Amber Long, Recruiting Operations Manager, Paper Transport

Out of all the incentives you offer, which do you think resonates with drivers the most?

“The “Driver of the Month/Quarter” is the most motivating. In addition to receiving a cash bonus, like they would with our other incentives, these drivers receive an engraved crystal truck trophy, and the director of Paper Transport has been known to send steaks to their homes.”

When it comes to having successful incentive programs, what do you think the key is?

“One thing we always try and do is look for ways to improve our truck driver incentive programs and make our drivers happier. The “Driver of the Month/Quarter” award is one program we’ve improved on since it first started.

Originally, we only gave out a small number of these awards to the drivers who ranked at the very top. This was fine at first, but as Paper Transport grew, we realized this now meant that we weren’t featuring an appropriate number of drivers relative to how big our fleet was becoming.

We decided to give out a greater number of these awards so we could recognize even more drivers. This gives them more incentive to have a good scorecard since the awards are much more attainable now.”

Aside from traditional incentive programs, is there anything else Paper Transport does to make drivers happy?

“One thing we always try to do is make our drivers feel welcome at our corporate offices. That’s why we have our offices open to all Paper Transport drivers in case they ever want to drop by and meet their managers or anyone else within the company. We also have an in-office gym and showers for the drivers as well.

Aside from that, we have a finishing program for new drivers called the Accelerate Class A CDL Training Program.”

What is the Accelerate program?

“The Accelerate Program is Paper Transport’s finishing school. This is for drivers who have completed CDL training and hold their CDL A but have little to no actual experience behind the wheel.

The program is a 3-weeks long, with a one-week in-class orientation and two weeks on the road, one-on-one with a driver trainer. The training is completely paid for, and while the drivers are in orientation, they get a private hotel and their own rental car. For drivers and trainees of opposite genders, the trainee will have their own private hotel during on-the-road training.

We started this program to make our new drivers more comfortable and confident while on the road. Some carriers throw new drivers out there without the support or one on one treatment these new drivers need, and that’s not what we wanted to do.

The biggest benefits to our drivers with this program is the one-on-one time with a trainer and the guaranteed pay after they complete the program.”

Who trains these new drivers in the accelerate program?

“We recruit drivers from our own fleet. Interested drivers apply for the driver trainer position and go through the normal interview process.

If they have a good attitude and no issues on their MVR, we’ll bring them into the “Train the Trainer” program where they learn how to mentor and educate the drivers who will be coming through the Accelerate program.

Once they pass that, they’re ready to be driver trainers. As an extra incentive, these drivers receive an additional $100 per day on top of what they would be making on the road.”

 

Truck driver incentive programs are one of the top ways to help drivers feel recognized while helping carriers meet their goals. The types of incentives you can implement are varied and can take some time to get them just right for your fleet. When you’re ready to put an incentive program in place, follow these guidelines and you’ll see success in no time.

truck driver incentive program checklist

FREE RESOURCE

Truck Driver Incentive Program Checklist

The best incentive program is the one that’s effective, sustainable, and engaging for drivers. Use this checklist to align your target behavior with rewards that motivate your drivers and create a program with lasting impact.

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lease purchase trucking company

Recruiters work hard to find the best candidates for their open jobs. Using all available resources, they need to need to differentiate their job postings from others that might be very similar. So it’s important to find out what your potential drivers are looking for in a new job and what can help your company stand out from the others.

In some cases, it takes more than just switching up your recruiting tactics. Sometimes it means adding a new lane to your business strategy. This new lane could be becoming a lease purchase company.

The Basics

trucking endorsementsMany CDL drivers are looking to advance their careers by owning their own trucks. However, this is a big step and requires a significant financial investment up-front. While some drivers are fine with buying their truck the traditional way, others may be looking for a more financially-friendly way to purchase a truck. This is where lease purchase agreements come in.

A lease purchase agreement is a legal arrangement between a driver and a carrier, where the driver leases a truck from the carrier for a set amount of time while driving for the carrier and making payments on the truck. Once the payments are made, the agreement is met and the driver fully owns the truck.

Lease purchase agreements can be a great solution for both drivers who are looking for a cheaper way to own their own truck and carriers looking to bring quality drivers on board. Drivers interested in lease purchase options are usually more experienced and serious about trucking as a long-term career. Two things that every recruiter loves to see in a driver.

If your carrier owns a number of trucks and is willing to get into the business of selling them through lease payments to drivers, this model might work for you. And if so, this is where you start setting up your strategy to enter this new aspect of your business.

This type of arrangement can bring in new leads for your recruiting efforts, as many drivers are interested in becoming an owner operator someday. But it also adds a level of complexity to your business. It’s essentially having a small business within a business, as the drivers are seeking to become their own company with their own vehicle.

Rules and Regulations

Becoming a lease purchase company requires a carrier to follow a set of federal guidelines that spell out all of the considerations of leasing. These rules inform all aspects of the leasing agreements. When drawing up all the various policies, paperwork, and contracts needed to lease trucks to your drivers, it’s important to understand the regulations that come with these transactions.

Transparency

As mentioned earlier, becoming a lease purchase carrier a great way to differentiate yourself from the competition. And unfortunately, it’s also an opportunity for carriers to put out deceptive marketing messages—ones that might make it seem like it’s an easy way for a driver to own their own truck with little work on their end.

The federal truth in leasing regulations have been put in place to stop that and protect both drivers and carriers entering into a lease agreement. These laws ensure transparency on all aspects of the lease.

Be sure to be clear and forthcoming about every aspect of the lease purchase agreement with drivers. That includes the terms, the payment schedules and all of the specific details of the lease. This will help you avoid any confusion later, or worse, lawsuits.

Risk

Like with anything, there is a level of risk associated with becoming a lease purchase trucking company. There’s always the hope that everything goes right, but sometimes they won’t.

All of the terms of the agreement can be as specific as possible, and everyone can enter into the agreement hoping things run smoothly. But, that’s unfortunately not always the case.

The driver might not be able to keep up with the payments, and then the carrier is put in a position of needing to reclaim the truck. Additionally, the driver might unfortunately have an accident with the truck while it’s still under lease and not fully owned.

This has legal implications on the lease company as well, if the driver can’t cover the costs to repair. Additionally, the carrier will need to ensure that the proper insurance and maintenance is being done on the truck throughout the lease period.

Do Your Homework

Knowing what your potential drivers are looking for, helps you develop the best set of tools to recruit the best candidates. As your company grows and expands your recruitment efforts, consider looking into becoming a lease purchase trucking company.

While not right for all carriers out there, this model can bring new leads to your hiring office, and new revenue streams to benefit your bottom line. But it’s also a complex business, with a decent amount of risk involved. As with most things, it’s good to do your homework to make sure you make the right decision.

lease purchase driver job description

Lease Purchase Driver Job Description Template

Is your job description written for the lease purchase driver? Making sure to lead with information that lease purchase drivers are specifically looking for is extremely important.

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driver recruiter
When building a driver recruiter team, experience can’t be overstated. But this doesn’t just mean experience in the recruiting world. Some carriers are finding value in bringing recruiters who have CDL experience into their organization. These recruiters have a knack for building relationships with drivers and turning candidates into hires, which is invaluable for any recruiting department.  

driver recruiter

Connie Garner, PWD Transportation Recruiter

We spoke with Connie Garner, Recruiter for Drive My Way client, PWD Transportation Inc. and CDL A holder. Connie shared with us how her experience as a CDL driver helps her to be a better driver recruiter. 

“I believe the fact that I have my CDL A and was a truck driver is how I’ve been able to recruit and retain a number of drivers. I know the life they live and the struggles they go through on a daily basis,” shared Connie.

Here’s why bringing on recruiters with CDL experience may take your recruiting and retention efforts to the next level. 

1. Drivers Trust Recruiters with CDL Experience

This isn’t to say that drivers don’t like or don’t trust recruiters who don’t have CDL experience. Drivers can have great relationships with recruiters of any background. It’s just that drivers will naturally gravitate towards recruiters who have experience as a CDL driver. Trucking is a close-knit community, where you’re more likely to trust people who are in that community than those who aren’t.  

Drive My Way’s President and CEO, Beth Potratz, shared her perspective on the value of recruiters who have CDL experience. 

Beth Potratz

Beth Potratz, CEO of Drive My Way

“At the end of the day, drivers have had so many bad experiences and broken promises that they’re almost at a point where they don’t trust. This leads to them to start looking for actual testimonials from other drivers who have actually lives it, to confirm whether or not this is something they want to move forward with,” shared Beth.

2. Trucking Industry Knowledge Goes a Long Way

There’s a common misconception among drivers that recruiters lie on purpose just to get drivers in seats. While it’s true that sometimes drivers aren’t given the correct information, it’s most likely because the recruiter doesn’t have the right information themselves, not because they’re trying to intentionally mislead drivers.  

The issue is that there’s a lot of vernacular, slang, and just general knowledge in the trucking industry that isn’t easy to learn right off the bat. This can lead to communication issues when a recruiter is trying to talk to drivers about a job opportunity that ultimately results in unhappy drivers and frustrated recruiters.  

For recruiters who have CDL experience, all that industry talk and specific information relating to runs, equipment, and hauls is already second nature to them. Drivers will appreciate speaking with someone knowledgeable of the industry and likely be more comfortable moving forward in the hiring process with your carrier.  

3. Building Long-Term Relationships

As any good recruiter knows, relationship building is key. Aside from just being in contact with a driver during the hiring process and then handing them off, CDL recruiters have that unique sense of camaraderie with hired drivers. These relationships can last well after the initial hire and could even be a factor in retaining talented drivers. 

“I don’t promise them anything I can’t give them. In the beginning, I didn’t want to be a recruiter, because I had only bad experiences with the ones I worked with. But as a driver turned recruiter, you really have a leg up. Drivers will come into conversations with you much more comfortable and open since they’re with ‘one of their own'”, shared Connie. 

Aside from that, recruiters who have CDL experience, will tend to know more people in the industry overall. This can lead to introductions with many great drivers your company wouldn’t have been able to get in front of otherwise. 

Having great recruiters in your organization is step one. Step two is finding the solutions that help your recruiters make the right hires. Drive My Way’s patented matching technology will identify top candidates based on your specific job requirements and match them with you.  

PWD Partners with Drive My Way for Success

PWD is a third–generation trucking company, delivering the best quality working environment to employees and first–class service to customers.

View the Case Study

 

advertising jobsWith thousands of carriers advertising jobs for truck drivers right now, how do you make sure yours resonates? If you’re recruiting for a smaller carrier, this can be even harder, since you may still be developing brand recognition. That’s not to say that creating a great job advertisement is an impossible task. It can seem daunting, but there are a few simple tips you can use to make sure your ads are getting noticed by the drivers you’re looking for.   

1. Don’t Oversell or Exaggerate

Truck drivers have a keen eye and low tolerance for job postings they find vague or suspicious. That’s why it’s extremely important to give drivers all the important and accurate information upfront when advertising jobs. When describing your compensation and benefits, avoid general terms like “competitive” or “fantastic” and instead, provide the details. While competitive means at or above market rate, the word has become so saturated over the last few years that it equates to “low” in the minds of many drivers. Drivers want to see hard numbers or odds are, they’ll quickly scroll away.  

2. Be Thorough

You never want a driver coming away from your ad, asking themselves “What’s the home time? Pay? Is it full or part-time?” Here is a list of the things that should always be included in any truck driver job ad. 

  • Employee Value Proposition: This is where you’ll answer two very important questions. Why is my company different (and better) than the competition? What about my company is attractive to truck drivers? (Visit our blog on the topic to learn more about the best way to answer these questions.) 
  • Job Title: Include what CDL class is needed type of haul, and type of run
  • Compensation: Include CPM or hourly, weekly, or yearly pay. Also include any sign-on bonuses or referral bonuses 
  • Benefits & Perks: What is covered under insurance, (health, vision, dental, etc.), PTO, 401K, etc. 
  • Home Time, Route, & Schedule: How often will the driver be home? What is the route and level of touch? 
  • Equipment: Truck specifics including technology and years of company trucks. 
  • Qualifications: Besides CDL class, are there other qualifications needed? Clean MVR? Minimum years of experience? Minimum age? 

job description3. Make It Easy to Read

You could have the best job posting, with all the information a driver could ever want about the position and your company. But that won’t matter if it’s organized in a way that’s difficult to read. After you’ve gathered all the information you’ll need for a job ad, start organizing by what would be the most important information to a driver reading it. Start with pay, haul, type of run, and move down until you get to smaller details like the model year of trucks to be used and pet-rider policy. 

Another best practice is to avoid using large blocks of text in your job ad. Instead, opt for bullets. This will make your job ad much more digestible for drivers, giving them an easy way to find information without scanning through chunks of text.  

4. Partner with a Job Distributor

Where the ad is placed is just as important as how it’s written. With hundreds of job boards and social media channels out there, it can be a pain to know where your time and resources are best spent to reach the drivers you’re looking for.  

Partnering with a recruiting platform like Drive My Way is the perfect way to get your jobs in front of qualified driver candidates.  We create customized advertising campaigns that reach drivers in the right place and the right time. Just like we did with Button Transportation, a family-owned and operated trucking company in California, that hired 10 new drivers within the span of just two months.   

 

Your job ad is likely the first impression a driver will have with your company, so making sure it’s a good one is key. The good news is that advertising jobs for your trucking position isn’t rocket science. Just put yourself in the shoes of the driver. If you were looking for a job, what information would you like to see and where would you like to see it? 

 

truck driver incentive program checklist

FREE RESOURCE

Truck Driver Incentive Program Checklist

The best incentive program is the one that’s effective, sustainable, and engaging for drivers. Use this checklist to align your target behavior with rewards that motivate your drivers and create a program with lasting impact.

Get the Checklist

truck accident procedure

No one wants to manage cargo claims or contract disputes, and a nuclear verdict in a catastrophic accident is a trucking nightmare. Unfortunately, if you’re in the industry long enough, there’s a good chance you will find yourself handling accident claims. To protect your driver and your company in the event of litigation, make sure you have a strong truck accident procedure in place well before it’s needed.

1. Establish A Clear Internal Procedure

Eric Zalud, Partner and Associate Chairman of the Litigation Department and Chairman of the Transportation & Logistics at Benesch Law

Eric Zalud, Benesch Law

Once an accident occurs, you’re working against the clock. It’s critically important to have laid the groundwork beforehand. We spoke with Eric Zalud, Partner and Associate Chairman of the Litigation Department and Chairman of the Transportation & Logistics at Benesch Law. He emphasized the importance of the “Golden Hour” and arguably a golden first few days.

These hours immediately after the incident are critically important for collecting evidence, alerting key members of your response team, and handling medical emergencies. If a lawsuit occurs, it may not happen immediately, so it’s important to preserve any information that may support your case as close to the time of the incident as possible.

One of the best ways to ensure that accidents are handled smoothly and efficiently is to establish a clear communication tree. Zalud notes that this often starts with the driver contacting the safety manager who then takes the lead in the rapid response efforts. In some companies, the in-house counsel or even the company CEO may lead the accident response efforts. You should also be prepared with a team of responders who help form the line of defense.

When asked who companies should keep in their rapid response Rolodex, Zalud recommended:

  • Approved legal counsel
  • Insurance carrier
  • Engineer
  • Hazmat unit
  • Truck manufacturer
  • Toxicologist
  • Company media spokesperson

Not all fleets need to have all of the listed resources in-house. For smaller fleets, maintaining an updated preferred provider list is a good accident response option. Any necessary responders should be contacted as quickly as possible after the crash to resolve the accident scene and preserve evidence for a later date.

2. Facilitate Driver Practice

Accidents are highly stressful situations, and even the best truck accident procedure in the world can’t perfectly predict human behavior. Drivers need to practice their role in the event of an accident so that they don’t freeze and forget important details. One method for training drivers is to use dashcam footage from previous accidents to proactively review safety procedures. This can be done either in group training or for the individual driver. Zalud notes that “drivers often are receptive to [the footage]. They get interested in what the camera is showing. That type of training also helps prevent accidents and also helps minimize liability.”

Safety incentive programs are another good way to encourage drivers to practice safe driving behavior. In addition to safe driver training, have drivers practice taking photos as documentation in the event of an accident. Drivers should use their phones for documentation only after the accident has occurred and they have secured the situation. As a baseline, drivers should photograph all vehicles involved, license plates and VIN numbers, regular and close-up shots of the damages, and pictures of the surrounding area and road conditions. Additional photos may be needed depending on the type of accident.

Drivers may be concerned about the repercussions of an accident on their job. Communicate that the best thing they can do is report the incident quickly and thoroughly without being overly defensive. Drivers should also receive clear instructions on what information to communicate to the safety manager and to any external responders.

3. Meticulously Document Accidents

A strong truck accident procedure includes detailed documentation from before and after the accident. It is the responsibility of the safety manager and/or your in-house counsel to keep current in HOS and FMCSA regulations as well as local, state, and municipal regulations and ordinances. Zalud adds that equipment information, maintenance records, and inspection data should all be part of systematically developed backdrop information that can help contextualize the accident. Safety managers should also have accurate records on all driver activity related to safety, including driver training, maintenance records logged and documentation of all pre-trip and post-trip inspections. 

In addition to traditional safety training and documentation, telematics and big data are becoming increasingly critical in accident proceedings. Outward-facing dash cams are standard equipment now, and they often help clarify the events of a truck accident. When asked about the role of dashcam footage in accidents, Zalud shared:

“Number one, they’re exonerative… That can kill many lawsuits in their embryonic phases. [On the other hand, if you are at fault,] knowing that can affect your dealings with the claimant or his or her counsel. You can cut a deal earlier. You can save litigation costs that way.”

A dashboard that enables crash analysis across your fleet over time is a valuable tool. The dashboard should include data that spans across your fleet and tracks statistics over time. At a minimum, document reasons, date, equipment failures, cost of repairs, preventability rating, drivers with multiple crashes, and similar information.

4. Keep Comprehensive Records

Tracking key data is only half of the equation. Securely retaining that data is just as vital, especially in the event of a catastrophic accident. The FMCSA has a three year requirement for accident record keeping, so that is the minimum length of time records should be on file. Failing to retain evidence can result in what’s known as a Spoliation Claim which can result in punitive damages. To avoid this, make sure to collect evidence early and preserve it securely to reduce your liability.

Ultimately, having a strong truck accident procedure is critical, but it’s only as good as your diligence in following it. Ensure that everyone in your fleet is confident in their role. A comprehensive truck accident procedure paired with well-documented driver training and meticulous record-keeping will help protect your driver and your company in the event of litigation. You may not be able to prevent a lawsuit, but you can reduce the liability and save valuable time and resources.

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pet friendly trucking companyBeing a pet friendly trucking company is more than just a perk for some drivers. Offering a pet rider program strengthens company culture, retention, and recruiting. Ultimately, pet programs are about driver satisfaction and happiness and should be considered part of an overarching retention strategy. With strong marketing that displays a positive company culture, pet programs can also bolster driver recruitment efforts. 

Driver Happiness Improves Driver Retention

Fundamentally, pet and rider programs are about driver happiness which directly influences driver retention. According to our Drive My Way Driver Happiness and Retention Survey, drivers who are unhappy at their jobs are more than 60% more likely to have job searched in the past 3 months. Unhappy drivers also report being unwilling to recommend their company to other drivers and do not want to work at their company for a long time. In contrast, the majority of drivers who are happy rarely think about looking for a new job and would recommend their company to other drivers.

Company drivers indicate that company culture is the second most important factor that drivers are attracted to their company. Being a pet friendly trucking company is only one small piece of company culture, but for some drivers, it makes a big difference. Offering a pet program is a great way to boost driver happiness, continue building a positive company culture, and increase driver retention.

Pets Improve Driver Happiness

As any pet owner knows, pets make our lives better in countless ways. Studies have shown that pet owners are less likely to suffer from depression, have lower blood pressure in stressful situations, and lower cholesterol. For truck drivers, the benefits of a pet while on the road are even greater. Some truck drivers struggle to maintain their health. Having a pet that needs regular exercise encourages drivers to regularly get out of their truck, stretch, and walk around. In addition, pets can reduce depression among drivers who spend long periods of time away from home. They fill our need for human touch and give companionship during long stretches away from loved ones.

We spoke with Sydney Abernathy, Director of Recruiting at Super T Transport. She shared her perspective on the benefits of being a pet friendly trucking company.

“We have a pet policy to attract and retain drivers and the benefit is increased wellness in our drivers. A pet can promote wellness for a driver with increased activity, reduced stress and anxiety, and by filling a need for companionship  Driver wellness is one of the biggest challenges a driver faces on the road. If you consider a pet policy part of your driver wellness program it is easy to see the return of the policy on your bottom line.”

Establishing A Successful Pet Program

woman and dogOffering a pet program is a great way to boost driver happiness and retention, and there are several best practices that will make your program successful. First, consider the guidelines you will share with drivers. It’s reasonable and recommended to include some restrictions on the type of pet or size of the animal to reduce the likelihood of equipment damage. Weights limits that allow pets up to either 30lbs or 60lbs are common among top carriers. Similarly, some fleets encourage drivers to stick to either cats and dogs and allow petitions for other pet requests.

Top carriers including JB Hunt, Knight, and Crete are known for allowing pets on the road and are a great model for implementing a successful pet program.

Communicating With Drivers

Whether you are starting a new pet program from scratch or revising an existing program, communication is key to success. Give clear expectations about cab cleanliness and communicate these from the start. Additionally, set concrete repercussions for not meeting those standards. For additional protection, some companies ask for a deposit to cover any potential damages. If you implement a deposit requirement, make sure the cost of the deposit is not prohibitive. An exorbitant deposit amount breeds resentment because you are then only offering a pet program in name.

Once you have established the basic guidelines for a pet program, help drivers take care of their pets on the road. Ultimately, a healthy, happy pet is a better companion and is less likely to damage equipment. 

Here are a few simple tips:

  • Encourage drivers to take their pet for a vet check before going OTR. 
  • Let pets get familiar with the space before drivers are far from home.
  • Drivers should be aware of any dangerous chemicals or work sites and keep pets out of harm’s way.
  • Remind drivers to prepare food, water, a waste plan, and an exercise plan before they hit the road.
  • Offer resources for drivers to be successful and safe with a pet on the road.

Marketing Yourself as a Pet Friendly Trucking Company

bulldog in semi truck

Good marketing transforms pet programs into a recruitment tool in addition to a retention asset. Consider advertising yourself as a pet friendly trucking company in everything from general ads to specific job descriptions. Position your pet program as part of driver care and a positive company culture. Having a pet program is unlikely to attract drivers if the rest of the job is not competitive. That said, if you have a compelling job offer, being a pet friendly trucking company may give you the edge over your competitors.

Communication is crucial in recruitment conversations, so be open upfront about the structure of your program and any restrictions. Drivers will appreciate the clarity and the drivers who are a good fit for the position will stay engaged.

Being a pet friendly trucking company benefits company culture, retention, and recruiting. Pets increase driver happiness, and that decreases turnover. Pet programs are a great way to attract quality drivers while supporting the physical and mental well-being of your fleet.

driver happiness and retention survey

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safety incentive program for truck drivers

All trucking fleets have safety standards, so why is a safety incentive program so important? A safety incentive program can help motivate drivers to high standards AND help document strong safety behaviors. Incentive programs keep the focus positive. As an employer, you encourage the right behavior while also boosting company morale. This type of program infrastructure can be a great way to build driver loyalty and accomplish several safety priorities simultaneously.

Do I Really Need Safety Incentives?

The short answer is yes. Here’s why.

Most trucking companies have safety procedures and expectations, and some may also have specific metrics for their drivers. Fleet safety should be a high priority, and incentive programs are an excellent way to communicate that to drivers and encourage behavior changes

While it may not be glamorous, fleet safety and tracking are key to regulatory compliance. In the event of a safety incident, you may need to be able to demonstrate safety protocol among your team.

regulatory compliance checklist

An incentive program can encourage drivers to record their safe driving and creates a positive feedback loop. An incentive program that rewards strong performance is also good for company culture and team morale. Everyone wants to be recognized for a job well done, even if it is a job expectation. There’s also an undeniable benefit to your bottom line. A strong company culture is likely to reduce driver turnover, and that’s a tremendous economic advantage.

The benefits of a well-run safety incentive program also extend to recruiting and marketing. In addition to building internal morale, companies can build off a strong reputation and safety-centric messaging in marketing and recruitment efforts. Use driver recognition and feedback to help create positive brand recognition as a recruitment tool. 

What Should Be Part of a Safety Incentive Program?

A thoughtful safety incentive program has several distinct characteristics. First, if you are offering monetary incentives, offer enough to be meaningful to drivers. The exact amount will vary based on your location, the type of driver, and your standard compensation package. If a meaningful monetary incentive is out of the question for you, consider other ways to reward drivers. Internal or external recognition, visible insignia for drivers to show off, and flexible home time are just a few non-monetary possibilities that will still motivate drivers. Not all employees are motivated by the same thing, so you may also consider implementing a multi-pronged incentive program. Ultimately, decide what you are best able to offer, and create a strong program based on your resources. 

If a meaningful monetary incentive is out of the question for you, consider other awards that benefit drivers. There are many ways to motivate and reward hard work.

As you design or reshape your safety incentive program, keep sustainability and structure top of mind. Ensure that the program you develop is sustainable for your current and future staff. Even though safety incentive programs are often supplementary to other safety efforts, they take time to maintain. Design something within your capacity. In addition, make sure the safety program is incentivizing the right behavior. For example, a program based solely around mileage may be unintentionally encouraging drivers to drive beyond their safe limits. Thoughtfully determine success metrics when you launch the program. Then, adjust the metrics as needed when you determine points of improvement.

When to Offer Safety Incentives (And When They Won’t Work)

A successful implementation strategy for incentive programs effectively identifies “When.” Common choices for the program cycle are quarterly or annual rewards. To decide what is best for your fleet, you may need to consider the types of jobs you offer. Will your incentive program be effective for both local and regional drivers? If you prioritize safe driving miles, do drivers have similar routes? Or do some drivers have primarily rural routes while others are largely urban? How will this impact drivers’ ability to perform well in your program?

To decide what is best for your fleet, you may need to consider the types of jobs you offer. Then, decide what driver metric you will measure and how drivers will accumulate rewards.

Another timing question to consider is about rewards accrual. Will incentives accumulate for drivers or will they start clean for each new time increment? Similarly, decide whether to offer tiers of incentives or whether you will regularly feature a set of drivers like an employee of the month. Regardless of how you structure the program, start incorporating training and clear safety policies from the beginning as part of driver orientation. 

How to Communicate Safety Incentives to Drivers

happy truck driverEarly and often is the best rule of thumb for sharing a safety incentive program with drivers. Set clear expectations at the start so that drivers know how to succeed. Based on your metrics for driver incentives, tell drivers exactly what they need to do. The results should be measurable, so drivers feel it’s a fair and attainable goal. Then, share the program in clear, simple language so there’s no confusion or feeling of mystery! 

When you talk about the safety incentive program with drivers, make sure to convey the program as a reward! Internally define the program objective, then highlight the benefits and positive rewards to drivers. Avoid a system that is punitive and focuses on how drivers lose points. If designed and communicated well, your safety incentive program will stand out as a positive differentiator from other companies.

driver happiness and retention survey

FREE SURVEY REPORT

Driver Lifestyle & Job Happiness Survey

We surveyed over 400 CDL truck drivers nationwide to discover what makes them happy in their career and life. Access the survey report to see the results.

Get the Results