recruit-truck-drivers

Given the shortage of drivers currently facing the truck industry, there’s a constant need to keep recruiting truck drivers. Hiring, training, and retaining drivers over the long-term is crucially important. At the end of the day, it all begins with recruitment of the right candidates.

If you can’t attract talent and recruit them into the organization, you won’t be able to even think about retaining them to meet the demands of the market. These four tips will help you improve truck driver recruiting.

1. Make your Marketing Driver-centric

Remember that drivers are going to find information about prospective companies and fleets on the regular marketing channels. So, good recruitment actually begins with good marketing presence and carefully curated content.

What kinds of content currently exists on the company website and Facebook page? If it is only information about how successful the company is, it won’t be of much use to a prospective employee. Ideally, much of your content is also driver-centric—that is, it details what kinds of benefits the drivers can get from that company.

Ultimately, a driver wants to know that the company will treat their drivers with care and provide the benefits they are looking for.

Highlight any wellness programs and culture initiatives that differentiate your company from the rest of the competition. Clearly provide information on schedules, work-life balance, fleet amenities and the rest.

The best marketing also includes testimonials from current drivers who have been satisfied with the experience so far. When designing the content, remember the drivers will always ask, “what can they do for me?” Making your marketing driver-centric will ensure that you provide an excellent answer to that question and will form a strong impression in their minds

2. Target the Right Audience

Before you start moving prospective drivers through the recruiting pipeline, you must make sure you’ve selected the right pool of candidates for the job.

Many driving fleets will have very specific needs and requirements that not all candidates would be ideal for. Targeting the precise segment of candidates can make the process more efficient and effective.

With the aid of databases, you can select drivers based on driver type, years of experience, haul experience, geographical location, or other factors. Focusing on any one of these particular segments ahead of time will save you time and energy as a recruiter. It also increases overall effectiveness of converted drivers. Not optimizing this part of the process means you’ll spend potentially hours chasing leads which were never well-suited for that particular fleet or job.

If you don’t have data on prospective drivers, Drive My Way can help you target the specific segment of drivers needed for your particular situation.

3. Use the Latest Digital Recruiting Methods

Use the latest and smartest, strategies to attract and recruit the talent you’re looking for. Social media is growing as a tool and drivers use these platforms to research companies, read comments, and evaluate employers. When viewers like, follow, share, or comment on your content, it can increase the audience exponentially.

Making sure you’re advertising job postings on social media isn’t enough. Post engaging content on your platforms which drivers will want to view. In addition, search engine optimization of your content will ensure that your website is receiving as much traffic as possible.

Use software such as Google Analytics or Google Keyword Planner to optimize your posts for trending phrases and words. Since drivers are on the road often, they’ll use their mobile devices instead of laptops to search for job leads.

Making the application process simple and easy will go a long way toward removing recruiting bottlenecks. Make sure that the applications are short and mobile-friendly.

Drivers will usually not have enough time to fill out long applications in one sitting. So make a shorter version with only basic information required, with the option to complete the remaining later.

Digital tools for recruitment and advertising are constantly improving, so keep and eye out for the latest and use your judgment on whether it would be useful.

4. Re-engage Old Leads

One unique challenge in the trucking industry is the unusually high turnover rate for drivers. This presents a difficulty for recruiters which isn’t faced in most other industries or sectors of the economy.

By re-engaging old leads and cold leads, recruiters can continually bring people into the pipeline even if they had dropped out before.

Many prospective drivers who were previously unavailable or chose to drive for a different fleet may be available soon. Leads and prospects that have gone cold or did not convert into driver status should not be forgotten. Instead, keep them in mind for the future.

While you don’t want to constantly pester them as to their status, you do want to make sure you follow up from time to time. Use drip marketing or engaging content on blogs, social media, or newsletters to stay connected with them and keep them in your radar. This leads to your fleet being fresh in their mind, and on their radar, when they’re considering a new employer.

While recruitment and HR management in the trucking industry presents unique difficulties, it also provides some opportunities through these tools and tricks. Master these four tips and recruiting truck drivers for your company will become less daunting.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

truck-driver-leads

With the driver shortage lurking over recruiters every day, it’s easy for them to fall into the trap of wanting to generate as many truck driver leads as possible. However, a “quality over quantity” strategy should apply now more than ever.

The last thing a recruiter needs is to take the wrong driver through their selection process. And, the last thing a driver needs is a company that can’t match their professional qualifications or personal lifestyle preferences.

When recruiters waste time with the wrong driver, they not only spend empty dollars, but they also potentially miss out on attracting qualified drivers. So how do recruiters generate more qualified truck driver leads?

BANT Strategy

The first step is to make sure that the forms used to collect driver leads follow a strategy called BANT. BANT stands for Budget, Authority, Need, and Timing.

Form field examples could include:

  • Budget: if the driver application costs money, indicate it on the page. Then, you’ll know drivers who fill out the form can afford the application fee
  • Authority: consider collecting drivers’ CDL license, special endorsements, years of experience, age, or driving record
  • Need: consider collecting the driver’s salary, benefit, home time, or location preferences
  • Timing: consider collecting the driver’s potential start date

It’s one thing to collect a driver’s general information. It’s entirely different to collect information that will instantly qualify or disqualify the driver for the position.

The position’s requirements should dictate which fields appear on the form, as including all of the options above on every form isn’t realistic.

When creating a form, consider what is a “must-have.” Make sure those questions appear on the form to attract the right drivers.

Targeted Advertising

Avoid producing generic landing pages or advertising. It’s important that the marketing clearly depicts the trucking job, haul type, etc. to attract the right driver.

For example, if you are marketing a job directly to women drivers, be sure to use imagery and language that is specific to that audience.

In addition, when marketing the job on social media or through another channel, it’s important to target specific audiences that find interest in the trucking job. Suppression lists are also beneficial to make sure the wrong people aren’t included in the audience.

Overall, following these tips will help ensure recruiters spend less time sorting through unqualified truck driver leads and more time focused on hiring and retaining qualified drivers.

truck driver job description template

FREE RESOURCE

Truck Driver Job Description Template

Your job description can either convert or lose applicants. Follow this template to make sure you’re on the right track.

Get the Template

retain women truck drivers

The amount of organizations across the nation that are striving to attract and retain women truck drivers will only continue to increase. However, in order to achieve this, employers must make a few changes to how they are approaching recruiting women truckers. Implement these 4 ideas to attract and retain women truck drivers.

1. Offer Flexible Work Options

Employers are able to get their drivers home more often by offering more local opportunities or implementing software that enables smart route scheduling. This is especially attractive to women drivers who are seeking a position that offers more work-life balance.

2. Showcase Women in Recruiting Language and Imagery

In order to hire more women truck drivers, employers need to communicate this mission. When advertising trucking jobs, it’s important to remember to also feature women drivers in imagery. In addition, evolving the voice used for recruiting messaging will allow organizations to appeal to more women as well.

3. Offer Advancement Options for Women

Companies that have women in leadership roles will oftentimes attract more women truck drivers as they see firsthand that women are welcome and capable of advancing in the organization. In addition, organizations that implement programs that specifically focus on engaging and advancing women will see a better response in driver retention than organizations that do not.

4. Ask for Feedback From Women Drivers

Like all drivers, women truckers enjoy sharing their opinion about their level of job satisfaction and future outlook on their position. Therefore, companies that fall victim to not asking for feedback from their women drivers will miss the opportunity to know what’s working well and what needs to be improved.

Avoiding these 4 mistakes will help ensure that employers are evolving their company culture to embrace and support women truckers.

ultimate guide to retaining truck drivers

Ultimate Guide to Retaining Truck Drivers

You work so hard to recruit the best truck drivers for your fleet. The trick is retaining them. This guide is packed with tips for retaining your fleet.

Get the Ebook

bad-dispatchers-contributing-to-truck-driver-shortage

Organizations across the country are rethinking their hiring and retention strategies for truck drivers. They are revamping benefit programs. Companies are making sure their compensation is competitive in the market. Fleets are putting bonus and incentive programs in place.

But what about taking a closer look at the relationship between dispatchers and drivers?

Truckers report that their relationship with their assigned dispatcher greatly contributes to their level of satisfaction with their job and with the trucking company. As an employer, here are some tips to keep in mind when evaluating dispatchers.

Train Dispatchers in the Trucking Industry

Some truck drivers are paired with a dispatcher who lacks industry experience and a clear understanding of the work. If the dispatcher and driver aren’t on the same page, there will be a disconnect, frustration, and oftentimes, quick turnover.

Some companies hire dispatchers who lack industry experience but know how to operate complicated dispatch software—allowing the company to pay them lower wages due to the level of experience.

Instead of throwing them to the wolves, companies need to make sure the dispatcher is fully trained before working with truckers. The dispatcher needs to get to know the drivers, understand the work, and feel confident about the industry before jumping in.

Ensure Dispatchers Are Honest with Their Drivers

Dispatchers with a lack of industry experience sometimes make claims to truck drivers that stretch the truth. Some of these statements could include:

  • I’ll definitely get you home this weekend
  • Your load will be waiting for you when you get back
  • You have plenty of time to make this delivery

It is the company’s responsibility to monitor these conversations in order to quickly correct false statements and ensure a good-standing relationship between the dispatcher and driver. The dispatcher is oftentimes the driver’s main point of contact at the organization, so if the dispatcher isn’t being truthful, the company will quickly earn a bad reputation.

Encourage Dispatchers to Share Driver Feedback

If a driver shares unsatisfied feedback with a dispatcher regarding their job, it is the dispatcher’s responsibility to share that feedback with the organization.

To encourage this, companies need to have frequent conversations with dispatchers to ensure they have a current pulse on driver satisfaction and areas of improvement.

This will reduce drivers feeling unheard and will improve communication across the organization as a whole. In turn, dispatchers can also share areas of improvement for drivers, and this can be used for driver incentive programs.

Overall, companies need to consistently evaluate the quality of their dispatchers. The relationships between drivers and dispatchers should be consistently evaluated and improved.

quick-guide-to-remote-onboarding-truck-drivers

FREE QUICK GUIDE

Remote Onboarding for Truck Drivers

Is remote onboarding the new normal in trucking? This quick guide is packed with tips to get you started or help you optimize your current remote onboarding process.

Get the Guide

why truck drivers leave

For the last several years, employers across the country are trying to reverse the problem and understand why truck drivers leave CDL trucking jobs. The truck driver shortage has caused employers to constantly reevaluate and improve how they attract, hire, and retain truck drivers. An abundance of effort, time, and money is often spent to find and hire a few drivers. When that driver leaves, the employer wonders if all of that effort was just a waste of time and money. Here’s a list of 3 reasons that truck drivers leave CDL trucking jobs.

1. Pay and Benefits

In the competitive job market, pay and benefits are becoming increasingly important for truck drivers. Companies are finding that they need to go above and beyond from a compensation and benefits perspective, as average simply isn’t cutting it anymore.

In addition to offering higher pay and better benefits, many companies have also tried adding a large sign-on bonus to the offer to attract truck drivers.

However, some of those companies have found that offering a large sign-on bonus might attract truck drivers up front, but then lead to low driver retention down the line.

This is due to the mentality of some truckers staying long enough to collect the bonus, then transitioning to the next company offering the same large check.

We asked our driver community if a good salary or a large sign-on bonus is more important to them when searching for a new job. The results of our poll are below.

2. Empty Promises

Companies are finding that they can no longer over-promise and under-deliver anything as truckers will quickly leave the company and share the details around the empty promise with their network. Drivers want to work for an organization that respects their opinion, values them as an employee, and knows their name instead of just their truck number.

In this job market, drivers demand transparency and honesty. They are sick and tired of being burned from companies in the past.

Employers who are transparent in nature with pay, benefits, job role, home time, etc. often reap the benefits. They may see more sustainable driver retention than those who exaggerate in a job description to get drivers in the door. In addition, if the truck drivers trust the organization, they won’t be shy to share this approval with their network. This builds an organic driver referral program for the organization.

3. Bad Dispatchers

As the saying goes, employees don’t leave the company. Employees leave the people at the company.

If truck drivers find themselves working with a terrible supervisor or dispatcher, it won’t be long until they start looking for a better opportunity.

The dispatcher is the primary representative for the company, and sometimes, a trucker’s only contact. Companies that spend time carefully matching dispatchers and drivers may see increased driver retention. Factor in personality types, leadership styles, etc., and you will oftentimes see better relationships form.

Companies who ask for dispatcher feedback from their drivers will be able to proactively correct or improve situations quickly.

Overall, companies that remember that this is a driver’s market will accel. Focus on putting truckers first and remain transparent with job requirements. Offer competitive pay and benefits to continuously stand out against the competition.

ultimate guide to retaining truck drivers

Ultimate Guide to Retaining Truck Drivers

You work so hard to recruit the best truck drivers for your fleet. The trick is retaining them. This guide is packed with tips for retaining your fleet.

Get the Ebook

fleet amenities

A great way for companies to stay competitive in today’s hiring market is to offer unique benefits and fleet amenities that prove to drivers that they are willing to go above and beyond.

Companies can stand out from the competition by investing in fleet amenity upgrades in order to create a more comfortable, home-like atmosphere in the cab.

Upgrade your Fleet Amenities

  • Comfortable seating
  • Memory foam mattress
  • LED lighting with dimmer switches
  • Sound dampening
  • APU units
  • Refrigerators
  • Cabinets and/or built-in storage space
  • Premium audio and/or TV system, could even include a Sirius XM Radio subscription
  • Freightliner In-Cab Training (FIT) System

Before investing in these upgrades, companies should be sure to ask their drivers what matters most to them. Drivers want their voices to be heard and will share their feedback when asked. Companies can receive this feedback by sending out a survey asking drivers to rank upgrades that are most important to them. When sending out the survey, companies can explain the reasoning behind these upgrades—to help drivers be more comfortable on the road and increase their job satisfaction.

But what’s in it for the company?

Upgrading your fleet amenities can be a costly venture for organizations; however, the long-term cost savings might be worth the initial investment. When implementing some of the upgrades, especially better seating, mattresses, and refrigerators, companies see their drivers improve their health and sleep patterns.

By implementing these upgrades, companies can experience some of the following benefits:

  • Healthcare savings
  • Reduced driver turnover
  • Increased driver job satisfaction
  • Electric, heating, and cooling cost savings

When it comes time to evaluate and brainstorm how to attract and retain better drivers, consider adding fleet amenity upgrades to the list!

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

truck driver shortage

Truck driver shortage increases are continuing to cause pain for companies across the United States. Currently, the shortage of truck drivers throughout the country is up to 48,000. It will likely continue to increase and is estimated to reach 175,000 by 2024.

To deal with this overwhelming truck driver shortage, some companies believe that they simply need to hire more drivers before other companies do. Unfortunately, this is a small band-aid on a much larger issue. Here are two reasons why fixing the truck driver shortage will take much more than just hiring more truck drivers.

1. Drivers and Employers Aren’t on the Same Page

There are not enough drivers to go around. But, there is also not enough time in the day for companies to find qualified drivers for their jobs. Day after day, recruiters face the process of sorting through the weeds to find drivers that meet their requirements. An overwhelming 88% of fleets report that most applicants are simply not a fit for their jobs.

This results in time wasted on both sides. Drivers are frustrated because they can’t find a company that meets their professional qualifications and personal lifestyle preferences. Employers are frustrated that they can’t find drivers that meet their needs.

fix-truck-driver-shortage

To spend less time searching for qualified drivers, employers need to make sure their job descriptions are accurate and optimized for their ideal driver. Exaggerating pay, benefits, or home time only results in retention issues and a damaged company reputation. Consider including driver testimonials, offering a driver referral bonus, or utilizing digital marketing to reach a broader audience. Each of these ideas can help increase the number of potential candidates that match the company’s ideal driver target market.

2. Employers are Focusing on Hiring, Not Retaining

Some employers have figured out how to attract qualified drivers for their jobs, but retaining them is another story. In this market, employers who offer great benefit packages, competitive pay structures, and performance incentives see a better long-term retention rate for drivers than companies who are just average.

However, aside from the pay and benefits, drivers also want to work for companies who treat them with respect, offer challenging and meaningful work, value their efforts, and find a way to get them home with their families more.

In other words, retaining qualified drivers in this market requires companies to consistently and creatively implement ideas to make sure their drivers are happy and engaged with their work.

ultimate guide to retaining truck drivers

Ultimate Guide to Retaining Truck Drivers

You work so hard to recruit the best truck drivers for your fleet. The trick is retaining them. This guide is packed with tips for retaining your fleet.

Get the Ebook

retain truck drivers

It is no surprise that America has been struggling with a truck driver shortage over the past few years. Now more than ever, the ability to retain truck drivers is key. Companies need to reevaluate their recruiting and retention strategies for finding and keeping qualified drivers.

Some companies have tried offering a large sign-on bonus for drivers. Too many are then faced with turnover once the bonus is collected. Other companies have promised drivers home time and great pay, but fall short of delivering these perks.

In order to start attracting, hiring, and retaining qualified truck drivers in this competitive market, employers should apply these tips to their driver recruiting strategy to give themselves a competitive advantage.

1. Value Drivers by Being Honest and Respectful

The last thing a driver wants is a company that over-promises and under-delivers. Before posting a job, companies should take the time to reevaluate the perks of the job. Make sure that pay isn’t inflated, home time is realistic, and benefits are factual.

Truck drivers are looking for a job that meets their qualifications, but they are also looking for a job that meets their lifestyle.

vanveenjf-1125254-unsplash

Drive My Way’s research shows that more drivers are requesting to travel with a pet or spouse. Similarly, drivers are looking for home time, and are placing more value on maintaining their health while driving. Companies who are truthful in their job advertisements will attract the best candidates. Look for drivers who not only meet the qualifications, but are also happy with the lifestyle that the job offers.

When a company promises a driver these perks but then changes the rules a few months into the job, the driver loses interest in keeping that job and also loses respect for the company.

After a driver loses respect for a company, that driver will let his or her entire network of drivers know exactly what happened. That will only increase the difficulty in filling future jobs.

2. Ask Drivers for Their Feedback Before They Post It Themselves

Sometimes it takes a company to post a job advertisement on Facebook to find out from their current drivers that something is unsatisfactory. Maybe their pay is too low, their benefits aren’t desirable, or the company over-promises and under-delivers. Drivers want supervisors to hear their opinions. They are willing to share feedback—the problem is, most companies never ask. Companies that retain truck drivers value input from all divisions of the fleet.

Instead of waiting to receive this feedback on a public social media platform, companies should ask their drivers for feedback directly through an engagement survey, an in-person conversation, or a even a quick poll.

This gives the company an accurate pulse on their drivers’ happiness and satisfaction with their jobs. It is also a great retention method because it proves that the company cares.

After collecting the feedback from drivers, companies should have a plan in place. It’s important to quickly address the feedback and make improvements. Nothing is worse than providing feedback to a company and never seeing anything come from the survey.

3. Offer Referral Bonuses and Performance Incentives

Drivers are looking for more than just a lofty sign-on bonus. To retain truck drivers, offer opportunities to be involved with a community. Acknowledge drivers for their accomplishments (no matter the size), and give areas for growth. Drivers with these opportunities, they are more willing to refer a friend to a job opening at their company. They will also be more engaged with their work.

Instead of constantly investing in replacing drivers, companies should implement referral bonus programs or performance incentives to retain their current, already-qualified drivers.

However, don’t let your referral bonus or performance incentive program fall into the “large sign-on bonus trap.” Focus on incentives that are linked to retention instead of incentivizing quick turnover.

When implementing a referral bonus program, give the money out after the referred driver is with the company for a specific time. Doing so protects companies from granting it immediately after a new driver starts, but having the driver quickly leave. In addition, performance incentives should reward drivers for maintaining good safety measures, fuel efficiency, and time management skills over an extended period of time. These not only help drivers stay focused on the company’s goals, but also reward them for living out the mission.

ultimate guide to retaining truck drivers

Ultimate Guide to Retaining Truck Drivers

You work so hard to recruit the best truck drivers for your fleet. The trick is retaining them. This guide is packed with tips for retaining your fleet.

Get the Ebook