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CDL Class B Driver

When it comes to recruiting a CDL Class B driver, knowing what and how to communicate regarding job details is key. As an employer, you have the natural advantage of being able to hire CDL A or CDL B licensed drivers for your position. That said, there are still some distinct differences when you are recruiting a Class B driver. 

Drivers with a CDL B chose different training and may have different expectations than CDL A drivers. If you’re having trouble recruiting a Class B driver, consider soliciting feedback on why drivers are declining your job or working with us to boost your recruiting efforts. Here are a few key components to include in your job description and how to tailor your recruiting to a Class B driver. 

1. Nature of the Job

Class B drivers know they will typically be driving a straight truck, box truck, large passenger bus, or dump truck. That said, there is a tremendous amount of variation within those jobs. A good job description is specific about the type of job available. In recruiting conversations, be clear, and state exactly what you are looking for. 

It’s better to be candid from the start than to have high turnover because of unmet expectations.

Another way to communicate job details is with a more personal approach. Consider sharing a “Day in the Life” of a typical driver at your company. When possible, connect serious candidates with current drivers at your company for a first-hand perspective. It shows prospective drivers that you value the perspective of your drivers and that the company has nothing to hide. If you are concerned about failing to bring candidates in if you are too open, bear in mind that turnover and empty trucks come at a high cost. It’s better to be candid and hire the drivers who will stay.

2. Home Time and Job Flexibility

Many CDL B drivers expect to stay closer to home. Geography can be a big factor in why drivers chose a CDL B over an A. With that in mind, make clarity in your home time policy a company priority. Prospective drivers should know exactly what they can count on. An unambiguous home time policy and succinct communication of that policy eliminates any accusations of favoritism and helps drivers plan ahead. 

3. Schedule, Hours, and Route

Hiring a Class B driver often means hiring a driver for city routes. The faster-paced environment isn’t for everyone, but a lot of drivers will thrive in a busier atmosphere. The best way to find out if a driver is a good fit is to ask about their past experience. Use behavioral interviewing and ask what they have done in similar situations in the past. How they talk about their past experience is one of the best barometers to gauge how they will handle the same kind of situation in the future.

truck driver checking his routeA Class B driver joining your company will want to know the details of their route. Tell drivers whether they frequently drive the same route or if they go to a lot of new places. Include any customer service expectations or delivery components. For some drivers, customer interaction will be a huge perk! If drivers like to meet new people and engage with others throughout the day, deliveries will make the job more interesting.

Family time is also a big part of the schedule. Many CDL B drivers expect to be home regularly. Share the schedule and let them decide if the hours are a good fit for their lifestyle.

4. Pay

When you are recruiting, keep in mind that a Class B driver may have different priorities than drivers who went straight to a CDL A. Many Class B drivers chose a CDL B license because it’s more affordable and much faster to earn. It’s true, local jobs tend to earn less than regional or OTR jobs, but the upfront cost for a Class B driver is also much lower. With that in mind, it’s safe to conclude that pay is very important to CDL B drivers. Be upfront about what compensation you can offer. Then, explore ways to incentivize strong driver performance with bonuses or other perks.

5. Company Culture

A Class B driver typically won’t be out on the roads solo for long periods of time like an OTR driver. This makes company culture even more important.

Identify your values as a company and think about how you can create a good work environment for yourself and others.

Because drivers and other employees interact regularly throughout the week, building a company culture of respect and camaraderie could not be more essential. Identify your values as a company and think about what type of setting you prefer to work in. Then, strive to create a team environment that reflects your values and keeps employees happy and engaged.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

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5 Tips to Focus Your Driver Recruitment Efforts

Trucking recruiters are remarkably busy people. There is always a lot to do, many competing priorities, and a million moving pieces to keep track of in the hiring process. Add into that mix, a global pandemic that’s causing chaos throughout the U.S. economy, and you’ve got a recipe for trouble maintaining focus on what’s important. So, what can help a busy driver recruiter add focus to their recruitment efforts? Here are 5 tips to get you started.

1. Know What Driver Recruitment Efforts Are Working

It’s always a good idea to take time and review your recruiting strategy. How are things going? How is your budget looking? What is your ROI on your efforts? These are all important to know and track. And tracking and measuring your results are the only way to determine if your efforts are working. When you get a good picture of what’s working well and what’s not, it makes it easy to decide which tasks to continue and which ones to stop.

2. Plan for Future Needs

It’s easy to get caught only focusing your efforts on your immediate hiring needs, but a great hiring strategy helps you plan for now and plan for the future. Ensure your current driver recruitment plans will dovetail into your future driver needs as well.

Are you planning to add new regional locations? Are you researching getting into new industries? Those plans on the horizon indicate needing more drivers to support it. Plan accordingly! One of the best ways to do this is to look at your carrier’s long-term strategy overall, and it will help you know where you’re headed. Once you have a clear vision of where you’re headed, you can plan your driver needs for now and for the future.

3. Use What the Survey Says

You probably already have something in place to poll your drivers to help you gauge your driver community’s overall workplace satisfaction, and that certainly is an important thing to know. But are you conducting any pre-recruitment surveys of your drivers, Especially drivers who have turned you down? This is a fantastic way to understand and help you focus on where your efforts might have fallen short or cease those tactics that didn’t help you find or land the truckers for your open positions. There are several survey options available, many of them free. A quick online search should help you find one that meets your budget and specific needs.

4. Narrow Down Your Sources

We already talked about measuring your efforts. Here’s a tip to take action after you look at your metrics. Take a look at the sources you’re using for driver recruitment and determine which ones are working best. Select the ones that are providing high quality candidates vs simply a high quantity of candidates. Then narrow down the list of sources and focus on the ones that are working best. Using less sources should enable you to improve your recruiting efficiency with less budget.

5. Let Drive My Way Help

Here at Drive My Way, we’re here to help you with your recruiting plans and execution. We have a variety of options available to help you find the drivers that will best fit your company and trucking needs. And don’t just take our word for it. We can show you how we’ve helped carriers like yours succeed.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

 

3 Tips for Hiring a Local Truck Driver

A local truck driver is not the same as the type of person who prefers Regional or OTR routes. Even though both are part of the trucking industry, these are often completely different groups of people. For example, many local drivers highly value home time and family time while OTR drivers are drawn to the call of the open road. Knowing this, align your marketing and recruitment efforts with the priorities of a typical local truck driver in your fleet. If you’re hiring local drivers, here are three tips to help you fill your fleet with quality drivers.

1. Talk About What Local Drivers Care About

Home Time

One of the biggest reasons that some CDL drivers prefer local jobs is for the home time. Driver home time should be clearly stated in your job description, but don’t stop with a general statement.

family time for local truck driver

That’s not enough detail to recruit the quality drivers that you want to hire. Instead, be specific. Drivers want to know when they will be home. Whenever possible, give exact times as well as days of the week. Are they working a day shift or a night shift? Will they be home every weekend? Will they work occasional weekends? Including all of this information in the job description ensures that you’re not wasting time. 

Pay

Every driver wants to know about pay. To recruit the best drivers, companies should offer drivers compensation that is at or above the average for your location and type of haul. If you find yourself deciding between a hiring bonus and higher pay, know that most drivers prefer higher pay. CDL drivers are typically well aware that driving local routes earns less pay than driving OTR, but they want to know what they can expect. 

Share pay information clearly in your job description and in early conversations with prospective drivers. If your company pays hourly, include the average hours that drivers typically work weekly. If they receive overtime pay after 40 hours, share the rate. Similarly, if your company pays CPM, share the average miles drivers work per week. Then, drivers can decide whether the job is a good mutual fit.

2. Don’t Leave Out the Details

Schedule

Local drivers expect to be home every day. In addition to sharing the hours or miles that drivers can expect on the job, share specific schedule information in the job description.

Drivers want to know the specifics. Will they have weekends off? What time does the shift start? How long is the typical workday?

For example, what time do shifts typically start, and how long is the average workday? If you are looking for a local truck driver to be on a night route, make sure that’s clear. Also, communicate when drivers will have days off. Drivers want to know whether they will have weekends off, consecutive days midweek, or another combination of days off. When it comes to time off, consistency is key. Local drivers want to know when they can make plans for family gatherings, sports games, and other life events.

Route and Customer Service

local truck driver in Seattle, WAThere can be a lot of variation in route for a local truck driver. As a result, including more specific information can be a helpful recruiting tool. Will drivers be primarily on highways or surface roads? Will there be frequent stops on a typical route?

Another important element of the route is the level of customer service. Share with drivers whether your runs are dedicated and be clear in your expectations for customer engagement. If there is a customer service component, consider offering specific training to your drivers. 

Level of Touch

Regardless of the level of touch required for your local truck driver position, include details in your job description. Loading and unloading aren’t necessarily a dealbreaker for drivers but be upfront about it. As drivers are pushing to be healthier on the job, some local drivers will appreciate the opportunities for additional movement and exercise

3. Articulate Your Value

Value Proposition

Your company value proposition is what sets you apart from other similar companies. In short, why should drivers choose your job and company? It is critical that you are able to identify and articulate this value.

Why should drivers choose your company over one of your competitors? That’s your value proposition.

It’s what will help you attract drivers and prevent losing drivers to competitors. Your value proposition can include anything from a competitive pay rate to weekends off or a great company culture if these things set you apart. 

Company Culture & Other Benefits

When you are creating your value proposition, consider what a local truck driver in your fleet values. Many local drivers are very family-oriented, so offering immediate medical insurance might be particularly valuable.

Also, because local drivers see their supervisors and colleagues more regularly, a good work environment and company culture can be particularly strong assets. Once you’ve identified your strengths, be sure to include them in job postings and hiring conversations!

recruit and hire local truck drivers

Recruit and Hire Local Truck Drivers

We partner with driver recruiters and hiring managers nationwide to help them recruit and hire local truck drivers for open CDL positions.

DEMO THE PLATFORM

How to Use Recruitment Automation to Hire Drivers Faster
Hiring the best drivers is the goal for any truck driver recruiter. Finding them quickly and efficiently is also particularly important. So leveraging tools to improve this overall process needs to be a priority. For any Human Resources or Talent Acquisition department looking to improve their speed to hire new truck drivers, here are some tips for using recruitment automation to hire drivers faster.

1. Finding and Engaging Drivers

hiring

Your recruiting team only has so many hours in the day to dedicate to work, and sometimes those hours get allocated to tasks not directly related to hiring drivers. Using recruitment automation technology to find drivers is like having employees who can literally work 24/7.

Corporate Website and Career Page

Your company website is the front door that greets potential hires. It’s your virtual first impression for candidates and customers. Can a driver quickly find the information they need and answers to their questions? If not, it’s something you should consider updating to reduce the back-and-forth communication. In addition, keeping your career page updated with open positions and integrating application forms with your recruiting software will save you time in the long run.

Automated Job Distribution

When you post a new CDL driver job on your website, do you then manually share this opening across other channels? Save hours of your time by automating your job distribution efforts by partnering with channels that will automatically get your job in front of the right drivers.

Engaging and Nurturing Drivers

Once a driver applies to your job, what happens next? Is the driver contacted immediately or does it take your team a bit to reach out? Automate this process by introducing nurturing campaigns that instantly contact interested drivers with next steps, all while not sacrificing the personal touch. Consider platforms that have omni-channel capabilities including chatting, emailing, and texting.

2. Tracking Applicants and Interviewing

Once you have a steady flow of driver applicants for your open positions, what’s the next step?

Applicant Tracking System

Pushing your interested drivers to your Applicant Tracking System (ATS) is another place to invest to improve the speed of your hiring process. You can also continue to nurture drivers once they are added to your ATS by setting up and monitoring campaigns that allow you automate periodic interaction.

Quick Guide to Behavioral InterviewingInterviewing

Once you’re ready to start interviewing drivers, automating the process around scheduling interviews and following up with candidates is key to save you time. Verifying a candidate meets all of your technical requirements on paper before interviewing and then training your team on behavioral interviewing techniques is key to success.

3. Verifying Employment and Background Screening

Screening is vital to making safe hires in the transportation industry, and using the right tools to automate your screening process is key to scalability.

Employment Verification

FMCSA requires every candidate to go through a comprehensive screening process before they’re fully hired. This includes the need for a verification of employment (VOE). If you’re still doing VOEs on paper forms and faxing documents to verify a driver’s work history, this entire process can be automated. Let technology help increase your efficiency.

CDL Employment Verification

Background Screening

In addition to verifying employment history, a full background screen is necessary to ensure quality hires. The following other information is typically collected in a background check:

  • Criminal records check
  • Drug and alcohol test
  • License check
  • Motor vehicle records check
  • Physical health exam
  • Sex offender status

4. Hiring and Onboarding

Using recruitment automation to find driver candidates is something that will help you find candidates more quickly. But what about after you find qualified candidates? Where can you continue to automate processes with your employees?

The onboarding process can benefit from adding automation. Using electronic forms instead of requiring candidates to come to the office for paperwork can prove to be mutually beneficial.

Past the recruiting process, look for ways to streamline processes with automation such as payroll and HRIS systems. You will recognize financial and time gains in the future this way.

If your team is looking for a better way to recruit drivers, give us a call. Here at Drive My Way we’re ready to help you put together a plan that best fits your needs, and help you recruit drivers that are the best fit for your open positions. Get in touch, we have a solution for you!

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

4 Ways to Expand Your Recruiting and Attract Minority Truckers

Taking score of your overall recruitment efforts is important. Who are you reaching? What candidates are you obtaining? When you ask those questions, you need to measure the overall demographics of who you’re attracting to your open jobs vs. your goals. Setting out to expand your recruiting reach and get the attention of new prospects should be a measurable goal. When you seek to increase your reach to diversify your pool of drivers, you sometimes need to include new tactics. Here are 4 ways to expand your recruiting and attract minority truckers.

1. Create a Culture of Diversity

Your hiring plan should reflect the applicants you’re seeking. Therefore, it’s important to have a hiring plan that helps you broaden your reach and mix of candidates. Creating a culture of diversity is something that can help you attract a broad range of minority truckers’ applications.

Does the workplace reflect a welcoming atmosphere for everyone? Is your environment welcoming to everyone?

Setting up a culture of inclusivity in your workplace can be a great advantage in bringing in more minority truckers.

2. Use Marketing to Your Advantage

minority truck driverDoes your marketing work for attracting minority truckers? That can mean everything from featuring women and people of color in your images on your website, to showcasing that your benefits package is inclusive across all applicants. Marketing to minority truckers is advantageous and can just take a little bit of adjustments to your current plans.

Take stock of the images and the language you’re putting out in your communications. Is it inclusive to all? If the answer is no, it’s time to adjust!

Don’t forget to include your benefits packages and other HR policies to be inclusive of these objectives. After that, you might find that you’re getting the maximum pool of candidates that you’re trying to reach.

3. Implement Referral Programs

Use your current driver pool to expand your recruiting efforts. This should be an effort to have all your drivers refer a candidate, but it is an opportunity to be overt to your current minority drivers to refer qualified friends and family to your open positions.

If you don’t ask your current drivers to send driver opportunities your way, they will never find you. Research shows that “word of mouth” plays a huge factor for drivers looking for trucking jobs. When looking for minority truckers, referrals can be great.

4. Align with Minority Truckers’ Organizations

There are several trucking organizations geared towards women, or minority truckers. Find ways to get in touch and align your efforts in conjunction with those organizations. Can you find opportunities to sponsor an event or activity? Or simply promote their organization’s badges or messages on your website? Regardless, there are plenty of ways to get engaged.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

digital advertising for truck drivers

Digital advertising is a core part of your company brand. Equally important is the way that your employees and customers talk about your company. The way you represent yourself online is like the store window to your company. Most people will decide whether to engage with your company based on what they see in that small preview and other people’s reviews. Optimize your digital advertising and hit your annual goals with these 5 digital advertising trends for the trucking industry!

1. Build your Trustworthy Reputation

One of your biggest assets is your company reputation. No amount of marketing or advertising can change driver or customer perception if they are not happy working for or with you. At the end of the day, people trust people. That’s why negative driver or customer reviews are so lethal. Don’t believe us? A recent Nielson report shared that 92% of consumer trust reviews from friends and family more than advertising. Even more importantly, a BrightLocal study found that 88% of people trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations. 88%! Strive to build a reputation so strong that your employees and customers can’t help but share their good experience.   

92% of consumer trust reviews from friends and family more than advertising, and 88% of people trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations. 

It’s important to support your reputation with nuanced content. Digital advertising campaigns are tactful and positive in their tone. Your content should ultimately be uplifting. That does not mean you should avoid crucial conversations. Doing so may be perceived as sacrificing authenticity. Instead, acknowledge hardship, and commit in words and actions to prioritizing the wellbeing of your employees and customers. If you are able to demonstrate that you care when times are tough, you will build a strong reputation that will serve you for years to come. 

2. Consistency is Critical

Once you’ve identified a target area for improvement or strategic growth, it is tempting to immediately dedicate resources to developing that channel. Before you launch into your next campaign, clearly identify how that campaign fits into your larger strategic goals. Then, articulate each step you need to take to get there. Consider how you can meet your goals while maintaining a consistent representation of your company and your brand through the process. 

If you are like many trucking companies, you may not be allocating a large budget to marketing or recruitment. We understand. Especially in years like 2020 that feel economically unstable, digital advertising is not likely to be at the top of your financial priority list.

When budgets are tight, be strategic and realistic, but don’t stop advertising. Get creative and take advantage of free marketing channels. Continuing to market your brand will keep your name fresh and top of mind for drivers and potential customers.

3. Go Where the Drivers Are

It may sound obvious, but the best digital advertising in the world won’t help you if you don’t get in front of the right eyes. It’s important that, as the employer, you deeply understand your target market and advertise where they are. Luckily, you don’t have to guess where to find truck drivers. The 2019 Overdrive Connectivity Report found that 39% of drivers rely on word of mouth to find a driving job. An additional 29% start with internet searches. The same year, the Trucker’s News Connectivity Report found that 56% of drivers used internet searches and 26% count on word of mouth. Social media is one of the natural intersections of internet searches and live feedback from drivers. Drive My Way’s Driver Happiness and Retention Survey found that 71% of drivers reported using Facebook. Youtube and Instagram were the next most popular platforms. 

You don’t have to guess where to find truck drivers. Internet searches and Word of Mouth are consistently top channels. Focus social media efforts on Facebook, Youtube, and Instagram.

In both studies, word of mouth and internet searches were clearly the top two resources for job searching. Word of mouth relies heavily on building a positive brand reputation and keeping your company top of mind with consistent marketing. On the other hand, social media, content marketing, and partnership-based brand outreach are great places to start for drivers who utilize internet searches. 

4. Make it Mobile

Quite simply, if you’re not prioritizing mobile digital advertising, you are missing a big opportunity. Recent data from our Drive My Way Driver Happiness and Retention Survey demonstrates that more and more drivers are relying on their phones for communication and their technological interactions. Knowing this, plan on your digital advertising being viewed on anything from a desktop computer to a tablet to a smartphone. The good news is, there are numerous ways to get tech-savvy without reinventing your advertising campaigns or your budget. 

The best way to start improving your mobile interface is to invest time in understanding digital channels. Evaluate the channels you are currently using, and create a vision for how users will optimally interact with those channels on desktop and mobile. Many digital advertising channels, including social media, search engine ads, and even your company website, may allow companies to preview ads in a variety of formats before publishing. Carefully review both mobile and desktop views for content and format to ensure that drivers get the best possible experience regardless of their viewing device.

5. Don’t Neglect the Essentials

As you look forward to digital marketing optimization, don’t miss this key trend! Get back to basics. The same fundamentals that you started with are the foundation of a strong digital advertising strategy. Have a clean, concise website. Make sure the content is up to date, clearly presented, and search engine optimized. Once you have communicated all of the essential information, complete a secondary test. Ask yourself, “Is there any other information or design elements that could be removed while still communicating clearly?” If yes, take it out! Clarity is key.

After your website is ready, strategically choose where else you want to have a digital presence, and conduct a similar review of those sites. 

  • Are you active on social media? 
  • Do you host or participate in a podcast? 
  • Is content marketing your main distribution channel? 

Carefully audit each distribution channel and decide whether it is still benefiting your company. Don’t keep a channel active unless you are willing to maintain it, AND it is still delivering value. Focus your time, attention, and budget on the channels that are performing best.

driver happiness and retention survey

FREE SURVEY REPORT

Driver Lifestyle & Job Happiness Survey

We surveyed over 400 CDL truck drivers nationwide to discover what makes them happy in their career and life. Access the survey report to see the results.

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 truck driving jobs for veterans

Even amid the roller coaster of supply and demand for many trucking companies in 2020, the truck driver shortage remains a constant. The factors underlying the shortageexperienced drivers retiring and insufficient new drivers entering the candidate poolare unlikely to change in Q4 of 2020 and into the new year. If the driver shortage is affecting your company, continue to reach out to untapped candidate demographics. Supporting efforts to promote truck driving jobs for veterans in your company can introduce a tremendous, underrecruited group of drivers. If veterans seem like an unlikely candidate pool, consider these five advantages of hiring veterans to your fleet. 

1. Hire for Experience

Many military personnel have credentials or experience that are directly applicable to CDL driving. Some servicemen and women drove large trucks as part of their regular duties. These drivers are essentially coming to your fleet with several years of experience already! In addition, military troops are frequently hauling hazardous materials. While these drivers will still need to earn their official HazMat endorsement, they are already familiar with many of the safety and skill requirements. Similarly, all truck driving jobs for veterans still require a CDL license, but for many service members, their experience will make the professional transition easy. 

2. Recognize the Value of Soft Skills

Veterans bring grit, self-discipline, dependability, and leadership to their jobs. Military personnel are specifically trained to be mission-focused and have a high level of situational awareness. As an employer, that means you can count on them to prioritize the success of the job and find a way to accomplish their route and overcome any obstacles. In addition, veterans tend to be highly attuned to their environment. 

Situational awareness can help drivers assess challenging situations quickly and efficiently while under pressure.

Similarly, veterans bring valuable mental stamina to their jobs. They specifically receive training to manage high levels of stress. As a result, many are able to perform well in chaotic or confusing situations that might leave others overwhelmed or indecisive. 

3. Fill Demand with Supply

Despite their wealth of skills, military veterans are not heavily represented in truck driving jobs. A few companies are industry leaders and specifically work to increase their number of available truck driving jobs for veterans. Perhaps more importantly, veterans are a largely unexplored candidate pool. Some veterans may already have their CDL, but others may not realize that they already have the skill set to earn their CDL license. Consider forming partnerships or direct recruitment channels with veterans with trucking experience.  It is a great way to recruit quality drivers who other companies may shortsightedly overlook.

4. Fit your Company

One of the big reasons for driver turnover is a low satisfaction rate with home time. For many drivers, especially those in OTR positions, long nights or weeks away from family may be a deal-breaker. In contrast, most veterans are used to time away from home while on deployments.

That said, it’s not just an easier adjustment for drivers. Families also have experience with limited home time and remote communication. 

The lifestyle fit between the military and trucking goes beyond home time. The structure of military life can lend itself to the hierarchical nature of many trucking positions. Also, just as many veterans got to travel through new parts of our country or other countries, truck drivers are also on the move. For many with a wandering soul, truck driving is a way to keep seeing new places as part of civilian life.

5. Veterans are Trained for Teamwork

Teamwork is essential for military operations. In truck driving, collaboration also plays a central role. Whether it’s communicating with other members of the fleet, management, dispatchers, or external contacts such as shippers or customers, teamwork is necessary for building strong relationships on the job.

PTS Worldwide knows exactly how to highlight that strength when recruiting for truck driving jobs for veterans. In their job descriptions, they specifically look for teamwork.

“Are you a safe and professional driver looking for a company that understands that their success is dependent on your success? PTS Worldwide is a company founded by drivers that know we need your skills, enthusiasm, and commitment to achieve our goals together.”

PTS goes on to specifically highlight collaboration in their call to action by inviting drivers to “partner” with them and “join our team.” This demonstrates a deep understanding of military values as well as a company culture that recognizes the importance of teamwork.

Follow by Example

There are several companies that are already well known in the trucking industry for their strong veteran recruitment programs. In addition to PTS Worldwide, CRST Trucking, Averitt, Schneider National, and JB Hunt are just a few of the companies that are known for their strong veteran recruiting program and culture.

There are a few key ways in which these companies help themselves stand out as military-friendly workplaces. Implementing even one or two of these strategies can make your company more attractive to veterans.

Active Recruiting

Companies who successfully recruit veterans don’t just rely on inbound marketing for hiring. They are proactive in reaching out to potential drivers early and often. For some companies, the recruiting process starts even before personnel have fully completed their duties. 

Align Language 

Language is powerful. In recruiting, it can be the difference between someone seeing themselves in your post and applying verses simply skimming through and ignoring.  Just as PTS Worldwide consciously recruits for teamwork, there are other ways to consciously align your marketing language with military vernacular. Schneider is a great example. When marketing to veterans, they include phrases such as “next mission,” “integrity,” “pride in your work,” and “core values” — all words that directly relate or appeal to people with military experience.

Value Military Experience

As you work to recruit more veterans, spend time creating a company culture and policies that support those future drivers. When applicable, consider counting military service as job experience. If that’s not feasible for your company, show your support through words and actions. Publicly and privately thank veterans for their service. Additionally, support programs for veterans such as Wreaths Across America or the Run for the Fallen. 

Ease the Transition

All new employees will go through a job transition period. For drivers making the transition from active duty to truck driving, there will be added changes. As an employer, consider promoting mental health support services, training your staff on working with veterans, or building a mentorship program to help ease the transition. Some companies, like JB Hunt, also make a Statement of Support to actively showcase their commitment to employing veterans. This is a great way to support truck driving jobs for veterans. 

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

How to Increase your Recruitment Efficiency on a Budget

The process of recruiting truck drivers can be as simple or as complicated as you want to make it. Now more than ever, the name of the game is efficiency. Getting fast results with as little impact to the budget as possible is key. But how do you improve your overall recruitment efficiency, especially during these uncertain times? Here are 5 ideas to get you started.

1. Work Smarter, Not Harder

One of the best pieces of advice for anyone in business is to always find ways to work smarter, not harder. Look at your overall processes and find the trouble spots and the jams. Once you have those identified, think about what you might be able to change. What pieces of your recruitment process can you streamline, or better yet, eliminate? If there’s a certain process that’s always taking more time than you can afford or using up more resources than planned, create a better plan.

2. Don’t Lose Any Driver Leads

One great way to increase recruitment efficiency is to make the most of the leads you already have. Going back to your hiring funnel, when potential drivers fall out, what is your process to re-engage them when new openings arise? Drivers who were found to be good matches but didn’t sign-on might be the best place to start. Recruitment efficiency is the combination of process improvement and leveraging all of the assets at your disposal.

3. Look to Rehire Former Drivers

If drivers left for another job, it’s worth keeping track of details that let you know why. If they left to chase a higher paycheck that’s one thing, but if they left due to a poor culture or other internal issues you have since improved, it might be time to reintroduce yourself to former drivers.

Bringing back former drivers can be the fastest way to fill an empty truck. Having a pool of qualified and experienced employees to call on for rehire can be a valuable resource. Make sure the people you want to come back to work for you know they are welcome back in the future.

4. Maximize Your Existing Technology

Ensure all of your technology is working for you. From your chosen applicant tracking system (ATS) to your website, make sure that you know how to measure success.

If there are features and functions available that you’re not using, find out what it takes to implement those to your advantage. There may be steps in the process that you can automate. Do it! Using your technology to its fullest advantage is a clear advantage in hiring.

Looking for an ATS? Improve Your Recruiting with DriverReach

DriverReach provides a modern recruiting management system for truck drivers.

5. Lower Your Cost Per Hire

Lastly improve recruitment efficiency by focusing on saving money for each new driver onboarded. Finding ways to save money or otherwise stretch your recruiting budget is one way to positively impact your company’s bottom line. In addition, working to reduce your cost per hire is a critical step. And freeing up funds that can be then reinvested or reallocated to drive other improvements. Take a look at all of the tactics you’re using for driver recruitment and then remove the least effective pieces. The goal is to have faster hires, at a lower cost overall.

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How to Improve Remote Onboarding for Truck Drivers

Whether digital process enhancements have been underway at your company for years or are completely new in your fleet, Coronavirus changed everything. Many tried and true processes for hiring, onboarding, and training are simply not feasible right now. With the possibility of continued social distancing looking likely, establishing a protocol for remote onboarding is well worth the time. Here are a few best practices that have proven successful in the trucking industry.

Prioritize People

Driver safety has to be a high priority for all fleets during this time. Drivers have questions about everything from orientation to sanitation. It’s important to address these concerns quickly and compassionately.

As you hire new drivers, it may be tempting to increase efficiency by removing human contact in the onboarding process and relying solely on technology. In this case, removing the personal touch is a counterproductive strategy. 

With reduced face to face contact, reaching out to new employees becomes even more important. Each interaction becomes more meaningful because there are fewer touchpoints. Studies have demonstrated that most driver turnover happens within one year. With such limited time, it’s critical to start out on the right foot. What you do in response to the challenges of trucking during Coronavirus will leave a lasting impression. With that in mind, even with remote onboarding, make every effort to warmly welcome new drivers into your company. 

Get Organized

Transitioning to remote onboarding for the foreseeable future may require a significant shift in workflow. As you prepare to refine the rapidly implemented processes of this spring, consider what you will need to move more permanently to remote onboarding. 

Gather the requisite hiring documents and establish a secure system for sharing them with drivers. That might include driver contracts, tax documentation, and any other hiring forms you typically request. 

Throughout the entire process, allocate more time than you would usually consider necessary. Both management and employees are likely going through several “first-times.” A buffer allows everyone involved to work through challenges without the pressure of a tight deadline.

Digitize Your Material

Review the training files you would normally give to new drivers. If a digital copy doesn’t already exist, make one and decide how you will share that information. Fleets with greater financial flexibility may consider working with a learning management system designed for onboarding truck drivers. For companies on a tight budget, start with free tools like online repositories that let you share files and folders. Drivers should be able to access much of their training material remotely.

There are some training components that work well in person but fall flat online. Avoid trying to use materials designed for in-person orientation in exactly the same format online. Instead, use this time to consider how that information is best presented in a virtual format. Often, that means shorter “in-person” sessions, and more opportunities for drivers to learn at their own pace.

Communicate Clearly

As you move forward with changes to your remote onboarding process, don’t forget that drivers are also in uncharted territory. Many drivers may not immediately be comfortable with using technology for onboarding. For some drivers, this may be the first time they are using many of the online job training tools. 

Prior to the onboarding process, communicate with drivers about exactly what they can expect. 

If you are using specific technologies, share the details early. When possible, give drivers time to explore programs like video calls on their own to prepare. Any guidance you can offer on accessing information will also help smooth the process. 

Infuse Your Culture

Driver orientation and onboarding is about more than information sharing from your company. It’s also when drivers meet their peers and supervisors. It’s hard to replace this kind of natural networking in remote onboarding. Video calls, social networks, and personal phone calls or emails all help bridge the gap.

During orientation, consider arranging at least one video call for all new drivers. This is also the perfect opportunity to launch a mentoring program. Then, new drivers meet other members of the fleet and have at least one personal connection to regularly connect with as they start their new job.

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Remote Onboarding

This free guide helps you transition to remote onboarding to boost your driver recruitment and retention. Use this guide to help get your remote orientation process right the first time.

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Total Compensation for Drivers: Communicating Effectively

Job offers that are limited to salary and health benefits tell a partial story. If you have great perks, equipment, or company culture, don’t miss a chance to talk about it! Total Compensation statements are a great way to showcase all of the direct and indirect compensation benefits you are offering to truck drivers. They won’t make up for bad pay, but they are a good way to highlight all of the assets you have to offer. In short, a total compensation package accounts for the complete pay package awarded to employees on an annual basis.

Direct compensation is the money that is paid directly to an employee. It typically includes base salary and incentive pay. On the other hand, indirect compensation accounts for all of the compensation that is not paid directly to the employee. Healthcare, retirement benefits, fuel perks, and continuing education opportunities are just a few examples of indirect compensation.

When talking to a candidate, share both the direct and indirect compensation to effectively communicate what you have to offer.

Typically, the more detail you’re able to give, the more beneficial the statement will be. Here are several common assets to include in a total compensation package.

Direct Compensation

Direct Compensation is divided into two main categories⁠—base pay and bonuses. These are the most common forms of compensation that come to mind for most people.

Base Pay

Whether you state base pay as an hourly rate or annual salary, be clear about your offering. At a minimum, include how much can drivers expect, the anticipated hours or miles, and how frequently they will get paid. If your company offers a per diem rate, this can also be included.

Bonuses

Clarify the potential for driver bonuses from the start. A few of the most common are safety, sign-on, performance, retention, and referral bonuses. Consider sharing the average amount that drivers receive from bonuses in addition to the top amount. By sharing both, drivers have realistic expectations (boosting driver satisfaction and retention) and a goal to strive for.

Indirect Compensation

Indirect compensation includes a very broad range of offerings. Most companies offer several forms of indirect compensation, but may not discuss it in their job offer. That’s a missed opportunity! Let drivers know about all of the benefits you’re providing them. While it may not come as money in the pocket, indirect compensation can be significant financial assets. Drivers who are a good fit for your fleet will value the benefits your company provides.

Health and Wellness

Medical benefits, life insurance, retirement benefits, and disability insurance are all common forms of health and wellness benefits. Nearly all fleets offer basic healthcare, and many go above and beyond. This section should communicate when benefits start as well as the details of each package. If you offer a 401K match, that’s another great asset to include in this section. Even perks like a gym membership allowance or smoking cessation programs can be included here. Drivers love to see that you are prioritizing their health by supporting their healthy habits. 

Days off

Paid time off and vacation days are another form of indirect compensation that drivers value highly. If you are offering any additional sick days or benefits for drivers who get sick with COVID-19, make sure your total compensation package includes that time. In addition, always include the anticipated schedule for home time in a job description or compensation package. 

Continued Education

Learning and development offerings are a wealth of opportunities for drivers. Many potential employees will be particularly excited to find a company that supports their professional growth. Whether you offer compensation for educational assistance programs or regularly facilitate career advancement opportunities, these are a form of indirect compensation. Not all drivers will take advantage of continued education opportunities, but those who do will be highly appreciative. 

Perks

Once you have covered the big benefits like health insurance and PTO, it might be easy to overlook smaller perks, but they add up! Perks can help drivers with big expenses such as relocation benefits or maintenance benefits. They might also defray the cost of smaller, regular expenses such as highway tolls, or gas. If you offer an EZ Pass or a Fuel Card, list it in your total compensation package.

Highlight Non-Financial Incentives

When asked, drivers revealed that there are consistently two top factors that determine whether they are looking for a new job: pay and company culture. Company leadership and culture are difficult to equate to a compensation amount. That said, they are no less important to driver recruitment and retention. If you prioritize a family-like culture or are very safety-minded, it’s appropriate to include this in your total compensation package. 

Foodliner, Inc. is one of the largest bulk food carriers in the country and a Transport Topic Top 100 carrier. They make a point to highlight company culture in their job descriptions. We spoke with Tim Yochum, Foodliner’s Director of Recruiting, and this is what he shared:

“The culture of a family owned business that values their people, treats them with respect, and works well together as a team is what makes us successful and provides a more positive experience for the driver. We have late model equipment, high quality shops, and a great customer base, but in the end it is people that make it all work.”

Similarly, quality equipment is a high priority for most drivers and can be included. Consider adding the year and type of truck as well as whether it is manual or automatic. Then, highlight any additions to the cab. If you provide a fridge, microwave, Sirius XM radio, or allow ride-along programs, share it in your total compensation package. To recruit drivers, there are also other attractive non-financial incentives that you can implement.

Communicating Total Compensation Effectively

After you have clarified exactly what your company is able to offer potential candidates, start drafting the total compensation statement. Ultimately, you’re looking for good hires and strong retention. Tim Yochum shares why he prioritizes transparency at Foodliner:

“We list non-monetary compensation in our job postings and if a candidate contacts us we are very open to providing the details of the compensation so they understand how this can affect their total compensation package. Honesty up front verses a surprise later is what we feel candidates value and appreciate. We feel that if the only reason you take a job is the money, then that will eventually be the reason you leave the job. We want the candidate to understand how the total package affects them and their family.”

Give as much detail as you are able to clearly share. It’s important for drivers to have all of the necessary information to make a decision. Even if drivers decline the job offer, that is a better outcome than hiring drivers with misleading information. If drivers feel like they have been intentionally deceived, they are more likely to quit and will have a poor impression of the company. There should be no hidden surprises. Clear communication that highlights everything you have to offer is the best approach to a total compensation package.

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