Trucking recruiters are tasked with finding top candidates for a position, matching them to the right jobs, and converting them into drivers for the fleet. This is dependent on finding a high number of qualified candidates through driver applications. One reason why you may not have as many candidates in your talent pool is because some percentage of leads start driver applications but soon abandon them.

You’ll get more candidates if you are able to reduce application abandonment. Just imagine the kinds of stronger candidates you’ll have in consideration if 10% of candidates don’t quit in the middle of your application! Here are four suggestions of how to reduce driver application abandonment and get better candidates in your recruiting pipeline.

1. Application length

Put yourself in the place of your candidates and imagine why they may abandon the driver applications. Most drivers don’t want to spend their limited free time filling out lengthy and complex applications. In fact, this is the top reason job seekers quit in the middle of applications. If your applications are requiring too many details, or take too long, most drivers are going to move on to other tasks. Worst case, you may be losing these candidates to rival carriers who have optimized and shortened their applications.

Ideally, your driver application should take no longer than 15 minutes to complete.

Instead of requiring drivers to provide all information up-front, focus on the basics and stick to questions that require simple answers. You can ask more detailed questions later, in your follow-up or in-person phone call.

2. Make applications mobile-friendly

Most drivers search and apply for jobs online through their smartphones. In this mobile-driven world, recruiters and fleet managers need to make sure they’re able to communicate and interface with drivers how they would prefer. Designing mobile-friendly applications means you’re able to meet drivers where they are and make driver applications easier for them.

Simply duplicating the web-based driver application for mobile devices introduces so many hassles, no wonder drivers abandon these!

Optimize your applications for a mobile-first experience by using mobile rendering, saved login information, and other useful features. Drivers will be more likely to complete applications which are quick and easy to complete on the go. They can easily access and submit these applications on their devices while waiting at truck stops or rest areas.

3. Avoid tedious steps

If your driver application is requiring candidates complete tedious steps, they’re going to abandon the application and run for the hills, or worse, to the next carrier’s application.

Nothing can be as difficult or tedious as requiring drivers to print or download something on the application.

These steps can be tough to complete if drivers are on their smartphones and looking at your applications while on a rest break. Using the proper software and encryption can go a long way toward drivers submitting the applications online without having to worry about their data being at risk. Build a safe and secure application on the back-end so as not to compromise the private information of candidates. E-signatures and other features make application submission simple, secure, and effective.

4. Be transparent

Your driver applications aren’t just simple tasks for candidates to complete as part of the hiring process. They’re also an integral part of the marketing and advertising for your fleet and carrier. Keeping this in mind, drivers will expect you to address their concerns about compensation, benefits, company culture, and other important topics. In this day and age, any reputation about your carrier has spread far and wide.

You can expect that your candidates have already heard everything about your company—the good, the bad, and the ugly.

What you can do to handle this situation is practice 100% transparency. Perhaps your carrier can’t provide the latest truck models or the strongest benefits, but that is balanced by the company culture, safety record, and spouse policy. Be upfront about whatever concerns you think drivers may have and make it easy for interested candidates to contact you with questions. If you’re serious about avoiding long-term turnover, your carrier should do what it can to promote transparency.

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Reduce Application Abandonment

We partner with employers to help them reduce application abandonment by nurturing candidates.

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Truck drivers are constantly bombarded with job postings and advertisements from different carriers. As a recruiter, your job is to reach as many potential drivers as possible and convert them into your fleet. This becomes extremely challenging when your job postings are ordinary and just like everyone else’s. You need more engaging content in your job postings to distinguish yourself from other carriers. Here are 4 tips to improve your truck driver job postings.

1. Choose written content carefully

There’s no doubt about it—the bulk of your job posting is going to be written content that includes a job description, basic requirements, and information about your carrier. However, you still want to be selective about how you write these sections. You can improve your job postings online by using carefully selected key phrases optimized for reaching your target audience. Even if your job postings aren’t online, you can be smart about which language to use. Using industry-specific phrases and simple language that truck drivers are familiar with will help tailor your posting to the right audience. Basically, you want to use the phrases that drivers are using, speaking, or searching.

2. Short, but informative

The length of your job posting can be tricky. We’ve seen all kinds of job postings and advertisements. Some carriers write just a few sentences and tease their audience with few details. Other postings are entire volumes of text, which no driver in their right mind is going to read through.

You want to strike a balance here—your posting should be long enough to hook drivers and give them the important details.

If your post is too short and lacks key details, then you haven’t caught their interest enough to follow up. You may be surprised to hear that if your post is too long, then drivers won’t actually read through all of it, and they’ll miss important details that you actually provided! Whenever in doubt of the length of the job posting, just remember the purpose of it. The purpose isn’t to give drivers all the information they need to make the decision, but rather to hook them with enough information so that they follow up. Be sure to provide a website or phone number so they can learn more.

3. Hierarchy of text

How do you provide enough information in the job posting without making it monotonous? The trick is to use a varied hierarchy of text to mix up how the information is presented. Resist the urge to write a word soup of sentences that aren’t connected. You can distinguish different sections by using proper headings. Use bullet points instead of paragraphs. Distinguish important details by using bolding, underlines, or different font sizes. Even though people are reading text, the human brain still processes it visually.

Anything you can do to visually catch the eye of the reader will make that information stand out and be considered important.

You can use this effect to highlight different parts of the job which you think are more important. If your carrier prides yourself on new model trucks or providing training, then that’s the text which should be highlighted.

4. Use multimedia to paint a story

Speaking of visuals, don’t forget the power of images and videos. Not all the important information about your job or your carrier can be conveyed through words. Using strong images can help paint a picture, literally, of what life as a driver for that carrier would be like.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so imagine how many a video is worth!

Videos can include testimonials from current drivers and day-in-the-life features. You can use the strengths of multimedia content to show your company culture and values. Drivers care about things like job satisfaction, professional development opportunities, and being part of a team. Writing about how your carrier can provide these things won’t be as effective as showing them directly.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

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When putting together your driver incentive programs package, there’s a few things to keep in mind. Think about what is a perceived benefit to your drivers, and whether it will also help you attain your overall company goals. Striking a good balance between the two is where the best incentive programs will be created.  Regardless if you’re putting your first incentive program in place, or looking to tweak your current offerings, we can help. Here are the key ideas you need to evaluate for your truck driver incentive programs.

What Are the Best Types of Incentives?

You should have a handle on what motivates your team of drivers. Listen to your drivers’ needs. Work to understand what encourages them. Then you can find a relevant set of driver incentive programs to put into place.

Are you falling short with on-time deliveries? Are your fuel efficiency metrics not being met? Is turnover too high? These are great places to start designing incentives to encourage change.

  • Additional Compensation: This is usually the go-to for any driver incentive program. Reward your drivers with cash if they achieve a stated goal within a certain time frame. That can be either a raise in their hourly rate, or an additional check that goes on-top of their normal take home pay. Cash rewards are fairly standard. And you can use them at any time. Even as part of their hiring process, to encourage them to stay with the company.
  • Recognition Rewards: Giving drivers something other than a financial incentive can sometimes be greater influence on positive behavior. A certificate, their name on a plaque somewhere prominent, or even a mention in a company newsletter to acknowledge their accomplishment could be more impactful than money could ever be. This type of reward is something that they’ll have forever, and the memory and sense of appreciation might last far longer than the bonus ever would.
  • Catalog Programs: Some companies choose to have achieving small milestones accumulate points over time. Then they can redeem those point for items in a catalog. These types of programs can help change behavior consistently over time. Your drivers might be working towards a new gadget that they’d love to have. Or even better, something that they know that their spouse would really love as a gift!

Cons of Incentives

Your truck driver incentive programs should work in conjunction with your overall goals, not in competition. When putting incentives in place you should take the time to ensure that you’re only going to encourage best practices, not accidentally promote conflict.

  • Unhealthy competition: As mentioned before, you want to be sure you strike the right balance with your driver incentive programs. Don’t create an environment where drivers are pushed to be cutthroat with each other. The last thing you’d want to do is fix one problem, and inadvertently create an unhealthy workplace where your drivers don’t act as a team.
  • Cutting corners: If the incentives are perceived as extremely worthwhile, or that drivers are in a race to achieve the goals first, it might lead to drivers taking shortcuts in their daily driving. This is something that should be clearly discouraged when you implement your driver incentive programs. Goals should never be encouraged to be met at the cost of safety or compliance.
  • Disengagement: Fairness is very important when establishing any type of new reward programs. If a driver immediately thinks “I could NEVER achieve that goal”, they might tune out and become disengaged. This would be a terrible outcome of a driver incentive program. Not only would it not help with the goals you’re trying to help achieve, you might lose an otherwise happy driver.

Incentive Programs Implementation

You want to foster an environment of fairness, so that working towards the incentives don’t unintentionally create new problems. When you put these truck driver incentive programs in place, fairness is a key measure of success.

  • Measure consistently: You should be able to easily measure any progress toward driver goals objectively. Be sure that the rules in place for your programs are clear as to how results are tallied, and by when. At the end of the time frame for achieving them has passed, everyone should be able to see where they landed in relation to the goals.
  • Be fair: Fairness should be built into any employee program. This might require a tiered or scaled approach depending on the variety of the runs and types of drivers you have. There’s always a way to be different and still keep things fair. This is the best way to avoid disengagement with your programs. It also ensures that each driver feels a sense of belonging to the overall company goals.

Truck driver incentive programs should help drivers feel recognized and companies meet their goals. Companies should put plans in place that reward positive work practices, and make your drivers feel acknowledged. This fosters a sense of satisfaction that can lead to better driver retention. The types of incentives you can implement are varied and can take some time to get them just right for your teams. When you’re ready to put an incentive program in place, be sure that the rules are fair and the objectives are clear.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

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Budget planning and compliance is one of the most important jobs at any company. A limited amount of funds is available for each team, and they need to be spent wisely. When working through your plans for hiring drivers, your recruitment budget is a critical piece of that puzzle. But when you step back and look at the process, and what you’re actually spending, maybe now’s a good time for also rethinking your driver recruitment budget.

First things first: do you have a good handle on your actual budget needs? It could be as simple as knowing your turnover rate, your anticipated need for additional drivers above turnover, and then multiply that by your current cost per hire. Simple, right? Could be that easy, but it’s probably a little bit more complex than that if you’re working through this for the first time. Especially when turnover rates keep climbing, and the driver shortage continues to grow. These things impact revenue because trucks are sitting idle, and once revenue decreases, assigned budgets can unexpectedly change at any time.

Cut out what’s not working for you

The best thing to do when looking at your driver recruitment process is to figure out where to cut out waste. Let’s start with the type of drivers your looking to hire. Here you want to be highly strategic in your approach, to attract the perfect candidates. You don’t want to simply generate hundreds of leads only to find out that they don’t meet even half of your qualifications. If that’s what you’re doing, you probably also know the amount of time it’s taking for your team to work that massive pile of ice-cold leads. It might be a good idea to try and find a better place to spend that money. And a better way to use all of those wasted hours.

Using your historical data of what’s worked best, where have you found the best matches? The best retention? Those are the places you want to ensure your recruitment budget is maximized.

Part of any good budgeting strategy is tracking everything related to that budget. You should have at least a simple tracker of costs vs. return on each tactic, best case on a monthly basis (if not weekly). Once you’re sure the low performing tactics are no longer part of your plan, you can work to reallocate those funds to tactics that produce the best matches. Who knows, saving those hours and dollars might allow for improvements in employee benefits or salaries that will make you more competitive down the road.

Stop making the same driver recruitment mistakes

At the end of the day, a recruitment budget shouldn’t be focused strictly on volume. Producing thousands of unqualified leads for your fleet, just bogs you down and creates capacity challenges throughout your day.

Instead, a driver recruitment budget should be focused on making meaningful connections with drivers that you are able to sustain in the long run.

It should be about focusing on spending in areas that will actually produce qualified matches for your fleet, instead of just trying to get warm bodies in your trucks.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

truck driver leads

Everyone on your hiring team is always busy. You seem to have a good stream of leads flowing in for your posted jobs. In general, these should be a very good things for a hiring team. However, you’re just not seeing the conversation rates you’d like. Team members are frustrated because they have to start all over every time a new driver is needed. And your trucks are still sitting empty. In this challenging time where you’re doing everything you can to hire drivers as fast as possible, why is converting truck driver leads so hard?

What’s Your Current Lead Conversion Process?

Do you have an effective lead management process in place? Or even any structured lead management process in place? If yes, that’s great! If no to both, this is certainly the place to start when trying to determine how to better convert your truck driver leads. You can quickly find an online guide to help your team map out a simple lead management process, that you can then tailor to your company’s unique needs. Once you’ve got that figured out, work to follow the stated process. Every. Single. Time.

Once you know you have a great process in place, what are you doing to optimize your process? And what tools are you using to alleviate pain points or roadblocks in the process?

One very important part of an lead management process is scoring the generated leads. Your process should include fast turnaround on scorning (if that’s not already being done for you), and then a quick hand-off to the person/team that contacts the drivers. An effective scoring process helps you focus on the most qualified truck driver leads first. And the those less qualified leads later. Getting leads already qualified from your marketing efforts is a best practice here. That saves so much time sifting through potentially useless lists that should never have been matched with your postings.

What are your lead contacting best practices? How quickly are they being contacted? Once a lead comes in, you need to contact them quickly. If a driver just applied for your job, they’re expecting to be contacted immediately. This way you’re sure that you’re doing your part to get the relationship off to a good start. This also helps to avoid losing top candidates to your competition. Making sure that you have a great contacting and nurturing process for your truck driver leads is a key component in getting the best candidates hired. This is also a great place to augment your manual processes with technology to automate the lead contacting (and recontacting) process more efficient and productive.

Tired of struggling with converting your truck driver leads? Then it’s time to take a totally different and personalized approach!

One way to improve converting your truck driver leads, is to starting thinking about the process in a completely different way. Like we do here at Drive My Way. Truck drivers aren’t just leads. They’re people. We have a driver-centric platform that provides matches instead of leads. We focus on matching employers with drivers for each unique job based on the driver’s professional qualifications and personal lifestyle preferences. Unlike traditional job boards, we match at the individual job level. We don’t deliver unqualified lead lists. We focus on quality matches. Which makes the most sense for you, and the drivers.

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Drive My Way matches drivers with companies based on professional qualifications and lifestyle choices.

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recruit truck drivers

It seems that we can’t escape technology in our lives, especially in the workplace. As a recruiting professional in a challenging and fast-paced industry, you’ve probably read about how using the latest technology can help you recruit truck drivers. However, having a keen skeptical eye, you also know that using technology cannot solve all problems, and can’t replaced good old-fashioned recruiting methods. In reality, both these things are true. You must use technology for recruiting, but you can’t rely on it blindly either. The trick is learning how and when to use technology to best aid your recruiting efforts.

Enhance and complement with technology

It’s true that technology can play a part in all functions of your recruitment efforts. It can help allocate your budget, optimize marketing, capture and manage leads, and onboard new hires. However, if you use technology blindly, that may be worse than not using it at all! You could end up hurting tried-and-tested methods that have worked for ages.

The secret to how and when to use technology is to always have it complement your human efforts, instead of hamper them.

There will always be some disadvantages to using technology, but thankfully your human efforts will be strong in those areas. Similarly, there are areas where humans tend to make more mistakes. Here is where technology can aid or accelerate your process. This way you’re always using technology to enhance your already strong human recruitment efforts.

The strengths and weaknesses of technology

Knowing how and when to use technology depends on a good understanding of its strengths and weaknesses. You’ll soon recognize that these usually complement human strengths and weakness. For example, one of the weaknesses of human effort is a limited capacity. You only have a limited number of recruiters, limited budget, or limited time.

Thankfully, technology excels at using limited resources to scale up operations that lead to better results.

Similarly, using human effort leads to low accountability. Bill thought Joan was going to complete that task, while Joan thought Adam was accountable for it. Assigning tasks to technology means that the tasks are track-able and measurable. Human effort can sometimes lack consistency and accuracy. We understandably feel tired, bored, antsy, or unmotivated when tackling repetitive tasks. These are perfect tasks to outsource to technology. Unless it breaks down, it reliably completes the same task repeatedly until you instruct it to stop.

However, don’t be fooled into thinking that there are no disadvantages to relying on technology. One of its weaknesses is that technology will be subject to bugs and glitches. This is when the human touch helps. When your automated systems suffer a technical error and don’t function as expected, you can ask recruiters to step in and cover the missing pieces.

Technology also needs constant monitoring and frequent technical support. Instead, people can be autonomous!

You don’t need to constantly monitor their actions or call in a repair crew when they make an error. If you empower your staff, they are capable of constantly self-adjusting. This is in contrast to technology, which is limited in its programming. If you instruct an algorithm to send a message to contact new leads, it will continue to attempt doing so until you tell it to stop. On the other hand, humans are adaptable. We can see when something isn’t working, and instead of making the same mistake repeatedly, we can flexibly adapt our behavior to fit the situation.

As you can see, humans and technology both have strengths and weaknesses. Usually the strengths and weaknesses complement each other. This is the secret to how and when to use technology.

Pair both human effort and technology toward their strengths to efficiently recruit truck drivers.

Only use technology to enhance human effort, and never to hinder it. Below are four examples.

1. Budgets

As we’ve written about before, you can use data to inform decisions about where to allocate your recruiting budgets. Technology can tell you which recruiting methods are successful for which jobs in which locations. At the end of the day though, recruiters have to use human judgment to make decisions about budget strategy and planning and sell this plan to supervisors to get their approval.

2. Finding drivers

Recruiters sift through the carrier’s jobs and decide which characteristics are important for each job. You need human effort to decide which candidate looks like an ideal match for a particular job. Technology can then help you target the right candidates and meet them where they already exist online. You can also use lead scoring, or matching services like Drive My Way to funnel the top matches into your recruiting pipeline.

3. Contacting and securing leads

Contacting leads quickly is crucial to converting them into hires. Technology can help you automate methods of contact and frequency of contact. Mobile-friendly applications and applicant tracking systems are tools you can use to gain contact information or other important data. But there is a danger in overusing technology here. Nothing can replace the human effect. Once you’ve identified top leads, contacting them with a personalized message adds the much-needed human touch.

4. Onboarding drivers

You can use technology to measure lead velocity and other metrics to help optimize your truck driver onboarding process. However, once you’ve already converted leads to hires, you don’t want to risk alienating them. Human skills here are essential. Listening to newly converted drivers and meeting their needs with your solutions will go a long way toward maximizing retention.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

Trucking recruiters are invaluable to their carriers. Recruiters find and interview leads, identify top talent, send them job offers, and shepherd drivers through training and orientation. Without strong recruiters, truck driving jobs would remain unfilled and trucks would be sitting idle. Recruiters are especially important for a tough industry like trucking which faces unique obstacles. Here are 4 challenges facing trucking recruiters.

1. Driver shortage

Let’s get the obvious stuff out of the way: the biggest challenge for anyone in this industry is the driver shortage. The truck driver shortage has increased, and the industry is lacking about 60,000 drivers. The driver shortage will continue and grow over the next few years, even taking into account a rise in autonomous trucks. While the driver shortage affects the entire industry and economy, it’s a major challenge for recruiters. Finding the best talent for your carriers is extremely difficult when the pool of candidates is narrow. Worse still, these candidates are courted by many carriers simultaneously, so it’s difficult to entice them with something the top carriers can’t match.

2. Unqualified leads

Even when you find drivers in the midst of the shortage, about 50% of your leads will not be viable. Recruiting is a matching game—you can’t just pick any driver for any kind of trucking job. While sorting through dozens of candidates you’ll find that over half are unqualified, uninterested, inexperienced, or otherwise inappropriate for the job. Meanwhile, you’ll have wasted time and precious recruiting budget on pursuing dead leads.

Instead of recruiting blindly, what you really need is a stronger matching or screening system.

3. High turnover

As if the driver shortage wasn’t enough, trucking recruiters also deal with high turnover. Once a carrier finally lands a top driver, it’s not as if they will always stick around for long. In fact, many fleets are losing more drivers than they recruit each year. Carriers can use incentives like signing bonuses, but those aren’t geared toward retention. Strong retention starts with strong recruiting, so it helps if you only hire drivers who are a good match. Survey your drivers to better meet their needs and match their values will also help reduce the chances they are enticed by job offers from rivals. Still, building a solid company culture which nurtures driver loyalty can be a long-term investment that is easier said than done.

4. Budget allocation

You only have so much money you can spend on recruiting. What and where to spend that money on are challenging questions facing all trucking recruiters. Today there are many more recruiting channels than ever before and carriers want to spread a wide net, reaching as many drivers as possible. At the same time, you may be wasting money if you allocate it toward recruiting methods that just aren’t effective. Measuring your recruiting effectiveness is an essential task that can help you allocate your budget efficiently, reach more drivers, and save money. Nevertheless, spending that kind of research is time-consuming in itself.

What recruiters really need are strong tools which help them recruit very efficiently through different channels suited for location and job type

 

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

Get the Ebook

truck driver career path

Truckers looking into a new job almost always have a lot of questions about the carriers they’re considering. They want to know what things look like in a month, in a year, in 5 years or even in 20 years. Being able to provide that information to a prospective new employee up-front could give you the edge in getting that driver hired today! So with the driver shortage and the hiring process as it is today, what is the Importance of a truck driver career path for your drivers?

Training to Hire

With all of the talk about the driver shortage, there’s much renewed interest in driving a truck for a living. For those completely new to the industry, the first thing they need to do is get training to get their CDL license.

Whether you offer your own training program, or partner with a local truck driver training school, be sure to let all potential drivers know that you’ve got a job for you once you graduate.

Be clear about what you expect and what they can expect. That can take a lot of stress off a trainee knowing that if they work hard and get through the training program, their next steps are already mapped out.

Driving for Life

Incentivize longevity. This can be through anniversary certificates or awards. Or even financial incentives that pay out after certain milestones are met.  You can also provide opportunities for continuous education to keep skills sharp. And training to ensure that your drivers are always up-to-date with current technology and regulations.

Be overt about the amount of possible driving options you have for your drivers. Different phases of their lives could change their preferences about time at home vs. time away.

Equipment preferences can change. Or even how much money they need to make at various stages in their lived. Knowing that you’ve got them covered at all steps, is an advantage to help you retain drivers. And this helps drivers feel confident in their role as a driver for your company.

Non-Driving Roles

Sometimes drivers have a need to pull in off the road for good. For whatever reason. But when they’re a good employee and not yet ready for retirement, what kind of truck driver career path might be mapped out in those situations. Often times good drivers can become the best instructors. Or even move into a role in the dispatch office or operations management.

Letting a driver know that these options are available to them along the way might make those transitions from the road to the office smoother when the time comes.

Paint the picture early for your drivers that you have a truck driver career path formulated for them at every stage of their lives. And advertise this on your website and other recruitment materials. For those new to the industry, be clear about your training programs and what comes next. Once they’re ready to hit the road on their own, give great options that fit their lifestyle at each phase. If they grow weary on the road, or can no longer drive, communicate other options for them outside of the 18 wheels. Doing this can instill an additional sense of loyalty to you from your drivers and help you to retain the best drivers.

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Drive My Way matches drivers with companies based on professional qualifications and lifestyle choices.

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truck driver recruiting

Truck driver recruiting success depends on finding the best candidates for the job, but also filling the position as quickly as possible. Recruiters have a limited budget and time with which to acquire top talent for their carriers, so recruiting efficiency is essential. In this data driven age, the importance of tracking measures of recruiting success cannot be overstated. Recruiting metrics are the key to evaluating the effectiveness of your recruiting process, and correcting course when needed. Measuring your success will not only help you hire the best candidates, but also direct where to allocate your time and money. Here are five ways to measure success in truck driver recruiting.

1. Time to contact or hire

How long does it take to reach key recruiting milestones? We’ve written before about how the top reason drivers decline jobs is because they accepted an offer which reached their table first. Quickly moving your candidates through the recruiting pipeline is probably one of the biggest contributors to recruitment success. Measuring time to contact or fill the position can tell you if you’re taking too long compared to industry standards or to your competitors. Comparing the time to X metrics across different positions will also lead to insights about driver supply for different types of driving jobs.

The time to fill metric adds up the total number of days an open job goes unfilled, and average time to fill looks at all unfilled positions over a set time period.

Time to contact should be measured in hours, not days. If it takes you over 24 hours to contact a lead, chances are they’re already in your competitors’ recruiting pipeline.

Even the first point of contact and phone screening can help push things along while you evaluate the candidate. Comparing the different times to reach a process step can help you determine which part of your recruiting pipeline is acting as a bottleneck. Perhaps you’re quick to contact but slow to interview, in which case you can afford to schedule interviews sooner.

2. Cost per hire

Cost per hire is an essential metric to measure the economic value of your recruitment resources and demonstrates the strength of your recruiting methods. It can also help you optimize your limited truck driver recruiting budget so that you get the most out of it. Cost per hire adds up all the expenses that go towards hiring new employees and divides that over the total number of hires for a given period of time. You aren’t necessarily looking to reduce this number to zero. There will always be hiring costs, whether they are recruiter fees, or costs of advertising, social media accounts, and job fairs.

You can look at cost per hire for a particular job type to further delve into which jobs are more expensive to fill. This can be justification for additional resources, or targets for reducing costs if possible. Looking at cost per hire by location will give you a sense of geographical effectiveness of your recruitment. Looking at the cost per hire of different recruiting channels can help determine channel effectiveness as well. There are a dozen ways to play with cost per hire, but all of them can help you eliminate unnecessary costs or reallocate recruiting resources in more efficient ways.

3. Source of hire or channel effectiveness

Truck driver recruiting today uses more sources and channels than ever before. Gone are the days of just magazine, radio, and billboard ads. Digital is king now, with more and more leads coming in from Google searches, Facebook postings, and online job boards. Identifying where applicants are coming in from can be incredibly helpful.

Recruiters can allocate costs and resources more effectively when they have a keen sense of where leads are coming from.

Understanding channel effectiveness can be done by measuring the number of successful conversions by channel. You can also break down channels by job type or geographical region. Don’t assume that the same channels or sources are equally effective across jobs or locations. Maybe your OTR job leads come in mostly through referrals, while company drivers come in through Facebook.

As mentioned above, you can also calculate the cost efficiency of your sourcing channels by measuring the amount of money spent on advertisements on each channel. Divide the ad spend by the number of visitors who successfully applied to the job to measure the sourcing channel cost per hire.

The lead sources that have the lowest cost per hire over the last few months should get the priority of your recruiting budget.

Put your money there for recruiting to be most effective. Again, careful to not do it across the board for all job types or geographical areas. The ideal is that you know which source is the most effective in each region for each different job type. Then allocate your recruiting budget to those sources and watch your leads grow, while still having surplus in your recruiting budget.

4. Quality of hire / first year quality

Some of the above measures take into account truck driver recruiting efforts before the job starts, but there are other important metrics which measure post-hiring. Connecting job performance with truck driver recruiting can help improve your recruiting efforts and allow for trends in quality of hires to be benchmarked and compared. We already know you’ll measure retention, but that doesn’t paint the whole picture. Measuring quality of hire after the first year on the job will give a sense of whether the hire was successful or not.

If truck driver recruiters are hiring low-quality talent, then the carrier is wasting valuable resources on hiring poor drivers.

Quality of hire is a simplified performance rating. Any time an employee’s performance is measured, there is a certain amount of subjectivity. Nevertheless, speaking to the hiring manager or supervisor and other colleagues will start to paint a picture of the performance of your hires. This can take into account everything from productivity to cultural fit with the fleet and the carrier. A simpler method is to measure the percentage of candidates submitted by recruiters who are accepted for employment plus the percentage of these that do not leave, divided by two. This indicates the effectiveness of the recruiter in identifying top talent. Along with turnover rate, first year quality will tell you the value that new drivers bring to the fleet and will distinguish your efforts to hire the best candidates.

5. Job satisfaction

We’ve recommended this before and haven’t changed our minds- measuring employee satisfaction is one of the secrets to maximizing retention and combating the driver shortage. Drivers and fleets are both looking for a strong match. If drivers aren’t happy with their carrier, it’s only a matter of time before they’ll start looking for a job elsewhere that appeals to them more. Given the driver shortage, your fleets can’t afford to lose a driver after already spending resources on hiring and onboarding. Do whatever it takes to keep drivers longer, and that starts with measuring their job satisfaction. You can measure this on a number of different dimensions, such as satisfaction with hours/home time, dispatchers, company culture, pet policy, etc. Having open-ended driver feedback is best, so that you learn about drivers’ likes, dislikes, wishes, and frustrations in more detail.

After drivers have given feedback, it’s the carrier’s responsibility to address their concerns, or risk losing them to rival carriers.

Measuring fleet managers’ satisfaction with drivers will also provide a 360-degree consideration of satisfaction. Ideally both parties are satisfied and no disputes need to be resolved. A low job satisfaction rating by the driver or the fleet manager indicates that the driver was either a poor fit for the position, or that job expectations were not clearly communicated. Either way, this provides more information to truck driver recruiters. Recruiters can use this information to either improve the quality of hires or improve their recruitment practices to provide a more realistic job preview.

ultimate guide to truck driver recruiting

Ultimate Guide to Truck Driver Recruiting

Current ways of recruiting truck drivers just don’t work anymore. That’s because recruiting isn’t a transaction. This ultimate guide helps carriers recruit for retention.

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There’s a multitude of choices out there for CDL drivers when it comes to searching for a new truck driving job. Jobs are being advertised every day in truck stops and magazines. Add to that the barrage of emails, text messages, and phone calls drivers get daily, the messaging can become overwhelming. And definitely confusing.

An employer’s goal should be to get their job posting in front of drivers in a marketplace once the driver is ready to receive it, and where the driver is comfortable giving out their personal information to connect. Truck drivers should trust that the job board will help find the best matches for the specific type of job they want. But that doesn’t always happen. Here are 4 pitfalls to know before using another truck driver job board website.

1. Quantity Over Quality

Many job boards pride themselves on the premise of “quantity over quality”. It’s all about the volume of leads. Carriers want to find pools of available drivers to fill their open jobs. But does more always mean better?

Some job boards claim to have thousands, hundreds of thousands, or even a million+ drivers. But if all of those “leads” don’t have anything to do with the types of jobs you’re seeking to fill, what difference does it make?

You’re going to still need to do a lot of work to sift through that pile of names to try and find someone who fits your needs. Focusing on quality over quantity has many benefits. Although the approach requires having a more methodical recruitment system, it can end up saving you time, money, and energy in the long-run.

2. Driver Privacy / Information Security

Hiring managers want more than just a name and phone number to start a conversation with a prospective driver. A completed DOT application is probably your ideal place to start. However, for drivers to feel comfortable providing more than some basic personal data, those drivers need to trust that their information is safe and secure and not going to be sent out or sold without their knowledge.

Job boards are notorious for sharing collected information with third-parties.

You should make sure you’re listing your jobs with reputable services so that drivers are willing to share more information with you prior to connecting with them. This helps ensure your search for a candidate starts off on the right foot.

3. Driver-Focused

Truck driver job boards often don’t have the drivers’ needs first. If the focus isn’t about what’s in it for the driver, the job postings on those boards might not get much traction if they don’t grab the driver’s attention and keep it.

Driver-centric recruiting techniques result in the most fruitful leads. When searching for job boards, be sure that they fit the drivers needs with the way they work and the way that they interact with them. Being mobile friendly, easy to use, and most importantly, speaking to drivers in a way they want to be spoken to, are things that make drivers feel like a particular truck driver job board is a good for them.

4. Qualified Matches

Truck drivers only decide to go looking for a new job when they no longer feel that their current job is meeting their needs. Those needs might be financial, driving preferences, work / life balance considerations, time away from home, or benefits related.

No matter what the reason, any good truck driver job board should know what the driver is looking for, as well as what the carrier needs are in order to produce a good match. A match that is qualified on each side’s preferences.

If you take a little bit more time up-front to be clear on what you’re looking for and what type of company the job is for, you can find yourself further down the hiring path faster, with the perfect candidate for your next hire.

If you’ve already spent too much time searching for truck driver job boards that you hope will find you great candidates to hire, we invite you to try something different and register with Drive My Way. We pride ourselves in standing out in the market, focusing on matching you with the right driver for your job instead of providing you with a giant list of “leads” that waste your time. If you’re ready to try something different and recruit for retention, schedule a demo of our platform today.

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Find and Retain Qualified CDL Drivers

Drive My Way matches drivers with companies based on professional qualifications and lifestyle choices.

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